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A Humanized Diet Profile May Facilitate Colonization and Immune Stimulation in Human Microbiota-Colonized Mice

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Standard

A Humanized Diet Profile May Facilitate Colonization and Immune Stimulation in Human Microbiota-Colonized Mice. / Moreno-Indias, Isabel; Lundberg, Randi; Krych, Lukasz; Metzdorff, Stine Broeng; Kot, Witold; Sørensen, Dorte Bratbo; Nielsen, Dennis Sandris; Hansen, Camilla Hartmann Friis; Hansen, Axel K.

I: Frontiers in Microbiology, Bind 11, 1336, 2020.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningfagfællebedømt

Harvard

Moreno-Indias, I, Lundberg, R, Krych, L, Metzdorff, SB, Kot, W, Sørensen, DB, Nielsen, DS, Hansen, CHF & Hansen, AK 2020, 'A Humanized Diet Profile May Facilitate Colonization and Immune Stimulation in Human Microbiota-Colonized Mice', Frontiers in Microbiology, bind 11, 1336. https://doi.org/10.3389/fmicb.2020.01336

APA

Moreno-Indias, I., Lundberg, R., Krych, L., Metzdorff, S. B., Kot, W., Sørensen, D. B., ... Hansen, A. K. (2020). A Humanized Diet Profile May Facilitate Colonization and Immune Stimulation in Human Microbiota-Colonized Mice. Frontiers in Microbiology, 11, [1336]. https://doi.org/10.3389/fmicb.2020.01336

Vancouver

Moreno-Indias I, Lundberg R, Krych L, Metzdorff SB, Kot W, Sørensen DB o.a. A Humanized Diet Profile May Facilitate Colonization and Immune Stimulation in Human Microbiota-Colonized Mice. Frontiers in Microbiology. 2020;11. 1336. https://doi.org/10.3389/fmicb.2020.01336

Author

Moreno-Indias, Isabel ; Lundberg, Randi ; Krych, Lukasz ; Metzdorff, Stine Broeng ; Kot, Witold ; Sørensen, Dorte Bratbo ; Nielsen, Dennis Sandris ; Hansen, Camilla Hartmann Friis ; Hansen, Axel K. / A Humanized Diet Profile May Facilitate Colonization and Immune Stimulation in Human Microbiota-Colonized Mice. I: Frontiers in Microbiology. 2020 ; Bind 11.

Bibtex

@article{6d215aaa5be544a3a1e839933dd7217e,
title = "A Humanized Diet Profile May Facilitate Colonization and Immune Stimulation in Human Microbiota-Colonized Mice",
abstract = "Background: In spite of the importance of the use of gnotobiotic mice for human fecal transfer, colonization efficiency and immune stimulation after human microbiota inoculation in mice are poorly studied compared to mouse microbiota inoculation. We tested the colonization efficiency and immune responses in mice bred for one additional generation after inoculating the parent generation with either a human (HM) or a mouse microbiota (MM). Furthermore, we tested if colonization efficiency and immune stimulation could be improved in HM-colonized mice by dietary approaches: if these were fed a diet closer to the human diet either in its sources of animal fat and protein [the “animal source” (AS) diet] or in its proportions of macronutrients from the normal sources of a mouse diet [the “human profile” (HP) diet]. Results: Although significantly lower in mice with a human microbiota (30–40{\%} vs. 61–70{\%}) the colonization efficiency was significantly higher in HM mice fed the HP diet (40{\%}), and in MM mice fed AS (70{\%}). The microbiota of mice fed HP was comparable to the microbiota of mice fed a standard rodent chow, while the microbiota of mice fed the animal source diet (AS) clustered separately. Mice inoculated with mouse fecal matter had significantly more CD4+ T cells and Cd4 expression and significantly fewer regulatory T cells (Tregs) and FoxP3 expression than human microbiota inoculated mice, but cell proportions differences were mostly apparent between mice fed the AS diet. Mice fed the HP diet had significantly higher expression of Cd8a. Conclusion: It is concluded that a diet with a humanized profile could support the establishment of a human microbiota in mice, which will, however, still elicit a lower colonization efficiency compared to mice inoculated with a mouse microbiota.",
keywords = "diet, fecal microbiota transplantation, flow cytometry, gastrointestinal microbiome, gene expression, lymphocytes, mice",
author = "Isabel Moreno-Indias and Randi Lundberg and Lukasz Krych and Metzdorff, {Stine Broeng} and Witold Kot and S{\o}rensen, {Dorte Bratbo} and Nielsen, {Dennis Sandris} and Hansen, {Camilla Hartmann Friis} and Hansen, {Axel K.}",
year = "2020",
doi = "10.3389/fmicb.2020.01336",
language = "English",
volume = "11",
journal = "Frontiers in Microbiology",
issn = "1664-302X",
publisher = "Frontiers Media S.A.",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - A Humanized Diet Profile May Facilitate Colonization and Immune Stimulation in Human Microbiota-Colonized Mice

AU - Moreno-Indias, Isabel

AU - Lundberg, Randi

AU - Krych, Lukasz

AU - Metzdorff, Stine Broeng

AU - Kot, Witold

AU - Sørensen, Dorte Bratbo

AU - Nielsen, Dennis Sandris

AU - Hansen, Camilla Hartmann Friis

AU - Hansen, Axel K.

PY - 2020

Y1 - 2020

N2 - Background: In spite of the importance of the use of gnotobiotic mice for human fecal transfer, colonization efficiency and immune stimulation after human microbiota inoculation in mice are poorly studied compared to mouse microbiota inoculation. We tested the colonization efficiency and immune responses in mice bred for one additional generation after inoculating the parent generation with either a human (HM) or a mouse microbiota (MM). Furthermore, we tested if colonization efficiency and immune stimulation could be improved in HM-colonized mice by dietary approaches: if these were fed a diet closer to the human diet either in its sources of animal fat and protein [the “animal source” (AS) diet] or in its proportions of macronutrients from the normal sources of a mouse diet [the “human profile” (HP) diet]. Results: Although significantly lower in mice with a human microbiota (30–40% vs. 61–70%) the colonization efficiency was significantly higher in HM mice fed the HP diet (40%), and in MM mice fed AS (70%). The microbiota of mice fed HP was comparable to the microbiota of mice fed a standard rodent chow, while the microbiota of mice fed the animal source diet (AS) clustered separately. Mice inoculated with mouse fecal matter had significantly more CD4+ T cells and Cd4 expression and significantly fewer regulatory T cells (Tregs) and FoxP3 expression than human microbiota inoculated mice, but cell proportions differences were mostly apparent between mice fed the AS diet. Mice fed the HP diet had significantly higher expression of Cd8a. Conclusion: It is concluded that a diet with a humanized profile could support the establishment of a human microbiota in mice, which will, however, still elicit a lower colonization efficiency compared to mice inoculated with a mouse microbiota.

AB - Background: In spite of the importance of the use of gnotobiotic mice for human fecal transfer, colonization efficiency and immune stimulation after human microbiota inoculation in mice are poorly studied compared to mouse microbiota inoculation. We tested the colonization efficiency and immune responses in mice bred for one additional generation after inoculating the parent generation with either a human (HM) or a mouse microbiota (MM). Furthermore, we tested if colonization efficiency and immune stimulation could be improved in HM-colonized mice by dietary approaches: if these were fed a diet closer to the human diet either in its sources of animal fat and protein [the “animal source” (AS) diet] or in its proportions of macronutrients from the normal sources of a mouse diet [the “human profile” (HP) diet]. Results: Although significantly lower in mice with a human microbiota (30–40% vs. 61–70%) the colonization efficiency was significantly higher in HM mice fed the HP diet (40%), and in MM mice fed AS (70%). The microbiota of mice fed HP was comparable to the microbiota of mice fed a standard rodent chow, while the microbiota of mice fed the animal source diet (AS) clustered separately. Mice inoculated with mouse fecal matter had significantly more CD4+ T cells and Cd4 expression and significantly fewer regulatory T cells (Tregs) and FoxP3 expression than human microbiota inoculated mice, but cell proportions differences were mostly apparent between mice fed the AS diet. Mice fed the HP diet had significantly higher expression of Cd8a. Conclusion: It is concluded that a diet with a humanized profile could support the establishment of a human microbiota in mice, which will, however, still elicit a lower colonization efficiency compared to mice inoculated with a mouse microbiota.

KW - diet

KW - fecal microbiota transplantation

KW - flow cytometry

KW - gastrointestinal microbiome

KW - gene expression

KW - lymphocytes

KW - mice

U2 - 10.3389/fmicb.2020.01336

DO - 10.3389/fmicb.2020.01336

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 32636823

AN - SCOPUS:85087464844

VL - 11

JO - Frontiers in Microbiology

JF - Frontiers in Microbiology

SN - 1664-302X

M1 - 1336

ER -

ID: 244614097