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A reduced cerebral metabolic ratio in exercise reflects metabolism and not accumulation of lactate within the human brain.

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A reduced cerebral metabolic ratio in exercise reflects metabolism and not accumulation of lactate within the human brain. / Dalsgaard, Mads K; Quistorff, Bjørn; Danielsen, Else R; Selmer, Christian; Vogelsang, Thomas; Secher, Niels H.

I: Journal of Physiology, Bind 554, Nr. Pt 2, 2003, s. 571-8.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningfagfællebedømt

Harvard

Dalsgaard, MK, Quistorff, B, Danielsen, ER, Selmer, C, Vogelsang, T & Secher, NH 2003, 'A reduced cerebral metabolic ratio in exercise reflects metabolism and not accumulation of lactate within the human brain.', Journal of Physiology, bind 554, nr. Pt 2, s. 571-8. https://doi.org/10.1113/jphysiol.2003.055053

APA

Dalsgaard, M. K., Quistorff, B., Danielsen, E. R., Selmer, C., Vogelsang, T., & Secher, N. H. (2003). A reduced cerebral metabolic ratio in exercise reflects metabolism and not accumulation of lactate within the human brain. Journal of Physiology, 554(Pt 2), 571-8. https://doi.org/10.1113/jphysiol.2003.055053

Vancouver

Dalsgaard MK, Quistorff B, Danielsen ER, Selmer C, Vogelsang T, Secher NH. A reduced cerebral metabolic ratio in exercise reflects metabolism and not accumulation of lactate within the human brain. Journal of Physiology. 2003;554(Pt 2):571-8. https://doi.org/10.1113/jphysiol.2003.055053

Author

Dalsgaard, Mads K ; Quistorff, Bjørn ; Danielsen, Else R ; Selmer, Christian ; Vogelsang, Thomas ; Secher, Niels H. / A reduced cerebral metabolic ratio in exercise reflects metabolism and not accumulation of lactate within the human brain. I: Journal of Physiology. 2003 ; Bind 554, Nr. Pt 2. s. 571-8.

Bibtex

@article{a2deff80abfa11ddb5e9000ea68e967b,
title = "A reduced cerebral metabolic ratio in exercise reflects metabolism and not accumulation of lactate within the human brain.",
abstract = "During maximal exercise lactate taken up by the human brain contributes to reduce the cerebral metabolic ratio, O(2)/(glucose + 1/2 lactate), but it is not known whether the lactate is metabolized or if it accumulates in a distribution volume. In one experiment the cerebral arterio-venous differences (AV) for O(2), glucose (glc) and lactate (lac) were evaluated in nine healthy subjects at rest and during and after exercise to exhaustion. The cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) was drained through a lumbar puncture immediately after exercise, while control values were obtained from six other healthy young subjects. In a second experiment magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H-MRS) was performed after exhaustive exercise to assess lactate levels in the brain (n = 5). Exercise increased the AV(O2) from 3.2 +/- 0.1 at rest to 3.5 +/- 0.2 mM (mean +/-s.e.m.; P < 0.05) and the AV(glc) from 0.6 +/- 0.0 to 0.9 +/- 0.1 mM (P < 0.01). Notably, the AV(lac) increased from 0.0 +/- 0.0 to 1.3 +/- 0.2 mm at the point of exhaustion (P < 0.01). Thus, maximal exercise reduced the cerebral metabolic ratio from 6.0 +/- 0.3 to 2.8 +/- 0.2 (P < 0.05) and it remained low during the early recovery. Despite this, the CSF concentration of lactate postexercise (1.2 +/- 0.1 mM; n= 7) was not different from baseline (1.4 +/- 0.1 mM; n= 6). Also, the (1)H-MRS signal from lactate obtained after exercise was smaller than the estimated detection limit of approximately 1.5 mM. The finding that an increase in lactate could not be detected in the CSF or within the brain rules out accumulation in a distribution volume and indicates that the lactate taken up by the brain is metabolized.",
author = "Dalsgaard, {Mads K} and Bj{\o}rn Quistorff and Danielsen, {Else R} and Christian Selmer and Thomas Vogelsang and Secher, {Niels H}",
note = "Keywords: Adult; Brain; Exertion; Female; Humans; Lactic Acid; Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy; Male; Oxygen Consumption",
year = "2003",
doi = "10.1113/jphysiol.2003.055053",
language = "English",
volume = "554",
pages = "571--8",
journal = "The Journal of Physiology",
issn = "0022-3751",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "Pt 2",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - A reduced cerebral metabolic ratio in exercise reflects metabolism and not accumulation of lactate within the human brain.

AU - Dalsgaard, Mads K

AU - Quistorff, Bjørn

AU - Danielsen, Else R

AU - Selmer, Christian

AU - Vogelsang, Thomas

AU - Secher, Niels H

N1 - Keywords: Adult; Brain; Exertion; Female; Humans; Lactic Acid; Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy; Male; Oxygen Consumption

PY - 2003

Y1 - 2003

N2 - During maximal exercise lactate taken up by the human brain contributes to reduce the cerebral metabolic ratio, O(2)/(glucose + 1/2 lactate), but it is not known whether the lactate is metabolized or if it accumulates in a distribution volume. In one experiment the cerebral arterio-venous differences (AV) for O(2), glucose (glc) and lactate (lac) were evaluated in nine healthy subjects at rest and during and after exercise to exhaustion. The cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) was drained through a lumbar puncture immediately after exercise, while control values were obtained from six other healthy young subjects. In a second experiment magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H-MRS) was performed after exhaustive exercise to assess lactate levels in the brain (n = 5). Exercise increased the AV(O2) from 3.2 +/- 0.1 at rest to 3.5 +/- 0.2 mM (mean +/-s.e.m.; P < 0.05) and the AV(glc) from 0.6 +/- 0.0 to 0.9 +/- 0.1 mM (P < 0.01). Notably, the AV(lac) increased from 0.0 +/- 0.0 to 1.3 +/- 0.2 mm at the point of exhaustion (P < 0.01). Thus, maximal exercise reduced the cerebral metabolic ratio from 6.0 +/- 0.3 to 2.8 +/- 0.2 (P < 0.05) and it remained low during the early recovery. Despite this, the CSF concentration of lactate postexercise (1.2 +/- 0.1 mM; n= 7) was not different from baseline (1.4 +/- 0.1 mM; n= 6). Also, the (1)H-MRS signal from lactate obtained after exercise was smaller than the estimated detection limit of approximately 1.5 mM. The finding that an increase in lactate could not be detected in the CSF or within the brain rules out accumulation in a distribution volume and indicates that the lactate taken up by the brain is metabolized.

AB - During maximal exercise lactate taken up by the human brain contributes to reduce the cerebral metabolic ratio, O(2)/(glucose + 1/2 lactate), but it is not known whether the lactate is metabolized or if it accumulates in a distribution volume. In one experiment the cerebral arterio-venous differences (AV) for O(2), glucose (glc) and lactate (lac) were evaluated in nine healthy subjects at rest and during and after exercise to exhaustion. The cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) was drained through a lumbar puncture immediately after exercise, while control values were obtained from six other healthy young subjects. In a second experiment magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H-MRS) was performed after exhaustive exercise to assess lactate levels in the brain (n = 5). Exercise increased the AV(O2) from 3.2 +/- 0.1 at rest to 3.5 +/- 0.2 mM (mean +/-s.e.m.; P < 0.05) and the AV(glc) from 0.6 +/- 0.0 to 0.9 +/- 0.1 mM (P < 0.01). Notably, the AV(lac) increased from 0.0 +/- 0.0 to 1.3 +/- 0.2 mm at the point of exhaustion (P < 0.01). Thus, maximal exercise reduced the cerebral metabolic ratio from 6.0 +/- 0.3 to 2.8 +/- 0.2 (P < 0.05) and it remained low during the early recovery. Despite this, the CSF concentration of lactate postexercise (1.2 +/- 0.1 mM; n= 7) was not different from baseline (1.4 +/- 0.1 mM; n= 6). Also, the (1)H-MRS signal from lactate obtained after exercise was smaller than the estimated detection limit of approximately 1.5 mM. The finding that an increase in lactate could not be detected in the CSF or within the brain rules out accumulation in a distribution volume and indicates that the lactate taken up by the brain is metabolized.

U2 - 10.1113/jphysiol.2003.055053

DO - 10.1113/jphysiol.2003.055053

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 14608005

VL - 554

SP - 571

EP - 578

JO - The Journal of Physiology

JF - The Journal of Physiology

SN - 0022-3751

IS - Pt 2

ER -

ID: 8441344