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Acetate stimulates secretion in the rabbit mandibular gland.

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Acetate stimulates secretion in the rabbit mandibular gland. / Novak, I; Young, J A.

I: Pflügers Archiv: European Journal of Physiology, Bind 414, Nr. 1, 1989, s. 68-72.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningfagfællebedømt

Harvard

Novak, I & Young, JA 1989, 'Acetate stimulates secretion in the rabbit mandibular gland.', Pflügers Archiv: European Journal of Physiology, bind 414, nr. 1, s. 68-72. https://doi.org/10.1007/BF00585628

APA

Novak, I., & Young, J. A. (1989). Acetate stimulates secretion in the rabbit mandibular gland. Pflügers Archiv: European Journal of Physiology, 414(1), 68-72. https://doi.org/10.1007/BF00585628

Vancouver

Novak I, Young JA. Acetate stimulates secretion in the rabbit mandibular gland. Pflügers Archiv: European Journal of Physiology. 1989;414(1):68-72. https://doi.org/10.1007/BF00585628

Author

Novak, I ; Young, J A. / Acetate stimulates secretion in the rabbit mandibular gland. I: Pflügers Archiv: European Journal of Physiology. 1989 ; Bind 414, Nr. 1. s. 68-72.

Bibtex

@article{0be40f60b19211ddb04f000ea68e967b,
title = "Acetate stimulates secretion in the rabbit mandibular gland.",
abstract = "In isolated perfused rabbit mandibular glands undergoing stimulation with 0.8 microM acetylcholine, replacement of HCO3- with acetate (25 mM) increased fluid secretion by more than 100{\%}. Other short-chain fatty acids, except for propionate, had a similar effect. We focused our further studies on acetate, and in order to find out the cause of its stimulatory effect we investigated whether acetate itself was transported. In the absence of any other transportable anions 25 mM acetate supported secretion at the same rate as 25 mM HCO3- or 25 mM Cl-, i.e. 20{\%} of the control rate. In solutions containing acetate as the only major anion (146 mM), fluid secretion was maintained at about 50{\%} of the control rate. Amiloride (1 mM) inhibited this secretion by about 90{\%}. In glands perfused with acetate/Cl- solutions, when the stimulatory effect was normally observed, amiloride (1 mM) inhibited secretion by 50-60{\%} and SITS (0.1 mM) had no effect. Probenecid reversibly inhibited 75{\%} of secretion in these glands, but it also inhibited 92{\%} of secretion in glands perfused without any acetate. Interestingly, the acetate effect was abolished in glands stimulated with a higher concentration of acetylcholine (80 microM). Results of this study suggest that acetate can be transported by salivary endpieces and that this transport involves an amiloride-sensitive Na+-H+ antiport. We postulate that acetate may in addition have some regulatory or modifier role in salivary secretion.",
author = "I Novak and Young, {J A}",
note = "Keywords: Acetates; Animals; Bicarbonates; Chlorides; Fatty Acids, Volatile; Male; Rabbits; Salivary Glands",
year = "1989",
doi = "10.1007/BF00585628",
language = "English",
volume = "414",
pages = "68--72",
journal = "Pfl{\"u}gers Archiv - European Journal of Physiology",
issn = "0031-6768",
publisher = "Springer",
number = "1",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Acetate stimulates secretion in the rabbit mandibular gland.

AU - Novak, I

AU - Young, J A

N1 - Keywords: Acetates; Animals; Bicarbonates; Chlorides; Fatty Acids, Volatile; Male; Rabbits; Salivary Glands

PY - 1989

Y1 - 1989

N2 - In isolated perfused rabbit mandibular glands undergoing stimulation with 0.8 microM acetylcholine, replacement of HCO3- with acetate (25 mM) increased fluid secretion by more than 100%. Other short-chain fatty acids, except for propionate, had a similar effect. We focused our further studies on acetate, and in order to find out the cause of its stimulatory effect we investigated whether acetate itself was transported. In the absence of any other transportable anions 25 mM acetate supported secretion at the same rate as 25 mM HCO3- or 25 mM Cl-, i.e. 20% of the control rate. In solutions containing acetate as the only major anion (146 mM), fluid secretion was maintained at about 50% of the control rate. Amiloride (1 mM) inhibited this secretion by about 90%. In glands perfused with acetate/Cl- solutions, when the stimulatory effect was normally observed, amiloride (1 mM) inhibited secretion by 50-60% and SITS (0.1 mM) had no effect. Probenecid reversibly inhibited 75% of secretion in these glands, but it also inhibited 92% of secretion in glands perfused without any acetate. Interestingly, the acetate effect was abolished in glands stimulated with a higher concentration of acetylcholine (80 microM). Results of this study suggest that acetate can be transported by salivary endpieces and that this transport involves an amiloride-sensitive Na+-H+ antiport. We postulate that acetate may in addition have some regulatory or modifier role in salivary secretion.

AB - In isolated perfused rabbit mandibular glands undergoing stimulation with 0.8 microM acetylcholine, replacement of HCO3- with acetate (25 mM) increased fluid secretion by more than 100%. Other short-chain fatty acids, except for propionate, had a similar effect. We focused our further studies on acetate, and in order to find out the cause of its stimulatory effect we investigated whether acetate itself was transported. In the absence of any other transportable anions 25 mM acetate supported secretion at the same rate as 25 mM HCO3- or 25 mM Cl-, i.e. 20% of the control rate. In solutions containing acetate as the only major anion (146 mM), fluid secretion was maintained at about 50% of the control rate. Amiloride (1 mM) inhibited this secretion by about 90%. In glands perfused with acetate/Cl- solutions, when the stimulatory effect was normally observed, amiloride (1 mM) inhibited secretion by 50-60% and SITS (0.1 mM) had no effect. Probenecid reversibly inhibited 75% of secretion in these glands, but it also inhibited 92% of secretion in glands perfused without any acetate. Interestingly, the acetate effect was abolished in glands stimulated with a higher concentration of acetylcholine (80 microM). Results of this study suggest that acetate can be transported by salivary endpieces and that this transport involves an amiloride-sensitive Na+-H+ antiport. We postulate that acetate may in addition have some regulatory or modifier role in salivary secretion.

U2 - 10.1007/BF00585628

DO - 10.1007/BF00585628

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 2726437

VL - 414

SP - 68

EP - 72

JO - Pflügers Archiv - European Journal of Physiology

JF - Pflügers Archiv - European Journal of Physiology

SN - 0031-6768

IS - 1

ER -

ID: 8570798