Forskning ved Københavns Universitet - Københavns Universitet

Forside

Adding ketamine to morphine for intravenous patient-controlled analgesia for acute postoperative pain: A qualitative review of randomized trials

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningfagfællebedømt

Standard

Adding ketamine to morphine for intravenous patient-controlled analgesia for acute postoperative pain : A qualitative review of randomized trials. / Carstensen, M.; Møller, Ann.

I: British Journal of Anaesthesia, Bind 104, Nr. 4, 01.04.2010, s. 401-406.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningfagfællebedømt

Harvard

Carstensen, M & Møller, A 2010, 'Adding ketamine to morphine for intravenous patient-controlled analgesia for acute postoperative pain: A qualitative review of randomized trials', British Journal of Anaesthesia, bind 104, nr. 4, s. 401-406. https://doi.org/10.1093/bja/aeq041

APA

Carstensen, M., & Møller, A. (2010). Adding ketamine to morphine for intravenous patient-controlled analgesia for acute postoperative pain: A qualitative review of randomized trials. British Journal of Anaesthesia, 104(4), 401-406. https://doi.org/10.1093/bja/aeq041

Vancouver

Carstensen M, Møller A. Adding ketamine to morphine for intravenous patient-controlled analgesia for acute postoperative pain: A qualitative review of randomized trials. British Journal of Anaesthesia. 2010 apr 1;104(4):401-406. https://doi.org/10.1093/bja/aeq041

Author

Carstensen, M. ; Møller, Ann. / Adding ketamine to morphine for intravenous patient-controlled analgesia for acute postoperative pain : A qualitative review of randomized trials. I: British Journal of Anaesthesia. 2010 ; Bind 104, Nr. 4. s. 401-406.

Bibtex

@article{2e047036ba5045e79b7340a8552d0bb2,
title = "Adding ketamine to morphine for intravenous patient-controlled analgesia for acute postoperative pain: A qualitative review of randomized trials",
abstract = "In experimental trials, ketamine has been shown to reduce hyperalgesia, prevent opioid tolerance, and lower morphine consumption. Clinical trials have found contradictory results. We performed a review of randomized, double-blinded clinical trials of ketamine added to opioid in i.v. patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) for postoperative pain in order to clarify this controversy. Our primary aim was to compare the effectiveness and safety of postoperative administered ketamine in addition to opioid for i.v. PCA compared with i.v. PCA with opioid alone. Studies were identified from the Cochrane Library 2003, MEDLINE (1966-2009), and EMBASE (1980-2009) and by hand-searching reference lists from review articles and trials. Eleven studies were identified with a total of 887 patients. Quality and validity assessment was performed on all trials included using the Oxford Quality Scale with an average quality score of 4.5. Pain was assessed using visual analogue scales or verbal rating scales. Six studies showed significant improved postoperative analgesia with the addition of ketamine to opioids. Five studies showed no significant clinical improvement. For thoracic surgery, the addition of ketamine to opioid for i.v. PCA was superior to i.v. PCA opioid alone. The combination allows a significant reduction in pain score, cumulative morphine consumption, and postoperative desaturation. The benefit of adding ketamine to morphine in i.v. PCA for orthopaedic or abdominal surgery remains unclear. Owing to huge heterogeneity of studies and small sample sizes, larger double-blinded randomized studies showing greater degree of homogeneity are required to confirm these findings.",
author = "M. Carstensen and Ann M{\o}ller",
year = "2010",
month = "4",
day = "1",
doi = "http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/bja/aeq041",
language = "English",
volume = "104",
pages = "401--406",
journal = "British Journal of Anaesthesia",
issn = "0007-0912",
publisher = "Oxford University Press",
number = "4",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Adding ketamine to morphine for intravenous patient-controlled analgesia for acute postoperative pain

T2 - A qualitative review of randomized trials

AU - Carstensen, M.

AU - Møller, Ann

PY - 2010/4/1

Y1 - 2010/4/1

N2 - In experimental trials, ketamine has been shown to reduce hyperalgesia, prevent opioid tolerance, and lower morphine consumption. Clinical trials have found contradictory results. We performed a review of randomized, double-blinded clinical trials of ketamine added to opioid in i.v. patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) for postoperative pain in order to clarify this controversy. Our primary aim was to compare the effectiveness and safety of postoperative administered ketamine in addition to opioid for i.v. PCA compared with i.v. PCA with opioid alone. Studies were identified from the Cochrane Library 2003, MEDLINE (1966-2009), and EMBASE (1980-2009) and by hand-searching reference lists from review articles and trials. Eleven studies were identified with a total of 887 patients. Quality and validity assessment was performed on all trials included using the Oxford Quality Scale with an average quality score of 4.5. Pain was assessed using visual analogue scales or verbal rating scales. Six studies showed significant improved postoperative analgesia with the addition of ketamine to opioids. Five studies showed no significant clinical improvement. For thoracic surgery, the addition of ketamine to opioid for i.v. PCA was superior to i.v. PCA opioid alone. The combination allows a significant reduction in pain score, cumulative morphine consumption, and postoperative desaturation. The benefit of adding ketamine to morphine in i.v. PCA for orthopaedic or abdominal surgery remains unclear. Owing to huge heterogeneity of studies and small sample sizes, larger double-blinded randomized studies showing greater degree of homogeneity are required to confirm these findings.

AB - In experimental trials, ketamine has been shown to reduce hyperalgesia, prevent opioid tolerance, and lower morphine consumption. Clinical trials have found contradictory results. We performed a review of randomized, double-blinded clinical trials of ketamine added to opioid in i.v. patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) for postoperative pain in order to clarify this controversy. Our primary aim was to compare the effectiveness and safety of postoperative administered ketamine in addition to opioid for i.v. PCA compared with i.v. PCA with opioid alone. Studies were identified from the Cochrane Library 2003, MEDLINE (1966-2009), and EMBASE (1980-2009) and by hand-searching reference lists from review articles and trials. Eleven studies were identified with a total of 887 patients. Quality and validity assessment was performed on all trials included using the Oxford Quality Scale with an average quality score of 4.5. Pain was assessed using visual analogue scales or verbal rating scales. Six studies showed significant improved postoperative analgesia with the addition of ketamine to opioids. Five studies showed no significant clinical improvement. For thoracic surgery, the addition of ketamine to opioid for i.v. PCA was superior to i.v. PCA opioid alone. The combination allows a significant reduction in pain score, cumulative morphine consumption, and postoperative desaturation. The benefit of adding ketamine to morphine in i.v. PCA for orthopaedic or abdominal surgery remains unclear. Owing to huge heterogeneity of studies and small sample sizes, larger double-blinded randomized studies showing greater degree of homogeneity are required to confirm these findings.

U2 - http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/bja/aeq041

DO - http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/bja/aeq041

M3 - Journal article

VL - 104

SP - 401

EP - 406

JO - British Journal of Anaesthesia

JF - British Journal of Anaesthesia

SN - 0007-0912

IS - 4

ER -

ID: 34071642