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An animal model for human masseter muscle: histochemical characterization of mouse, rat, rabbit, cat, dog, pig, and cow masseter muscle

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningfagfællebedømt

Standard

An animal model for human masseter muscle: histochemical characterization of mouse, rat, rabbit, cat, dog, pig, and cow masseter muscle. / Tuxen, A; Kirkeby, S.

I: Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Bind 48, Nr. 10, 1990, s. 1063-7.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningfagfællebedømt

Harvard

Tuxen, A & Kirkeby, S 1990, 'An animal model for human masseter muscle: histochemical characterization of mouse, rat, rabbit, cat, dog, pig, and cow masseter muscle', Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, bind 48, nr. 10, s. 1063-7.

APA

Tuxen, A., & Kirkeby, S. (1990). An animal model for human masseter muscle: histochemical characterization of mouse, rat, rabbit, cat, dog, pig, and cow masseter muscle. Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, 48(10), 1063-7.

Vancouver

Tuxen A, Kirkeby S. An animal model for human masseter muscle: histochemical characterization of mouse, rat, rabbit, cat, dog, pig, and cow masseter muscle. Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery. 1990;48(10):1063-7.

Author

Tuxen, A ; Kirkeby, S. / An animal model for human masseter muscle: histochemical characterization of mouse, rat, rabbit, cat, dog, pig, and cow masseter muscle. I: Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery. 1990 ; Bind 48, Nr. 10. s. 1063-7.

Bibtex

@article{dcdad9a0f29211ddbf70000ea68e967b,
title = "An animal model for human masseter muscle: histochemical characterization of mouse, rat, rabbit, cat, dog, pig, and cow masseter muscle",
abstract = "The masseter muscle of several animal species was investigated by use of a histochemical method for the demonstration of acid-stable and alkali-stable myosin adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase). The following subdivisions of fiber types were used: Type I fibers show weak ATPase activity at pH 9.4, type IM fibers react moderately, and type II fibers react strongly. Rat and mouse masseter muscles contained type II fibers only, as did some rabbit masseter muscles, whereas other rabbit masseter muscles possessed equal amounts of type I and II fibers. Cat and dog masseter muscles possessed both type II and I fibers, with type II predominating. Cow masseter muscle consisted mainly of type I fibers, although some cow masseter muscles contained a very small number of type II fibers. Pig masseter muscle had both type I, II, and IM fibers. One of the characteristics of human masseter muscle is type IM fibers, which are rarely seen in muscles other than the masticatory muscles. Therefore, pig masseter muscle might be a suitable animal model for experimental studies, such as an investigation of the distribution and diameter of fiber types in the masticatory muscles before and after orthognathic surgery.",
author = "A Tuxen and S Kirkeby",
note = "Keywords: Adenosine Triphosphatases; Animals; Cats; Cattle; Classification; Disease Models, Animal; Dogs; Humans; Hydrogen-Ion Concentration; Masseter Muscle; Mice; Myofibrils; Rabbits; Rats; Staining and Labeling; Swine",
year = "1990",
language = "English",
volume = "48",
pages = "1063--7",
journal = "Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery",
issn = "0278-2391",
publisher = "W.B.Saunders Co.",
number = "10",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - An animal model for human masseter muscle: histochemical characterization of mouse, rat, rabbit, cat, dog, pig, and cow masseter muscle

AU - Tuxen, A

AU - Kirkeby, S

N1 - Keywords: Adenosine Triphosphatases; Animals; Cats; Cattle; Classification; Disease Models, Animal; Dogs; Humans; Hydrogen-Ion Concentration; Masseter Muscle; Mice; Myofibrils; Rabbits; Rats; Staining and Labeling; Swine

PY - 1990

Y1 - 1990

N2 - The masseter muscle of several animal species was investigated by use of a histochemical method for the demonstration of acid-stable and alkali-stable myosin adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase). The following subdivisions of fiber types were used: Type I fibers show weak ATPase activity at pH 9.4, type IM fibers react moderately, and type II fibers react strongly. Rat and mouse masseter muscles contained type II fibers only, as did some rabbit masseter muscles, whereas other rabbit masseter muscles possessed equal amounts of type I and II fibers. Cat and dog masseter muscles possessed both type II and I fibers, with type II predominating. Cow masseter muscle consisted mainly of type I fibers, although some cow masseter muscles contained a very small number of type II fibers. Pig masseter muscle had both type I, II, and IM fibers. One of the characteristics of human masseter muscle is type IM fibers, which are rarely seen in muscles other than the masticatory muscles. Therefore, pig masseter muscle might be a suitable animal model for experimental studies, such as an investigation of the distribution and diameter of fiber types in the masticatory muscles before and after orthognathic surgery.

AB - The masseter muscle of several animal species was investigated by use of a histochemical method for the demonstration of acid-stable and alkali-stable myosin adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase). The following subdivisions of fiber types were used: Type I fibers show weak ATPase activity at pH 9.4, type IM fibers react moderately, and type II fibers react strongly. Rat and mouse masseter muscles contained type II fibers only, as did some rabbit masseter muscles, whereas other rabbit masseter muscles possessed equal amounts of type I and II fibers. Cat and dog masseter muscles possessed both type II and I fibers, with type II predominating. Cow masseter muscle consisted mainly of type I fibers, although some cow masseter muscles contained a very small number of type II fibers. Pig masseter muscle had both type I, II, and IM fibers. One of the characteristics of human masseter muscle is type IM fibers, which are rarely seen in muscles other than the masticatory muscles. Therefore, pig masseter muscle might be a suitable animal model for experimental studies, such as an investigation of the distribution and diameter of fiber types in the masticatory muscles before and after orthognathic surgery.

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 1698954

VL - 48

SP - 1063

EP - 1067

JO - Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery

JF - Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery

SN - 0278-2391

IS - 10

ER -

ID: 10140642