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Artificial selection for structural color on butterfly wings and comparison with natural evolution

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningfagfællebedømt

  • Bethany R. Wasik
  • Seng Fatt Liew
  • Lilien, David Armond
  • April J. Dinwiddie
  • Heeso Noh
  • Hui Cao
  • Antónia Monteiro

Brilliant animal colors often are produced from light interacting with intricate nano-morphologies present in biological materials such as butterfly wing scales. Surveys across widely divergent butterfly species have identified multiple mechanisms of structural color production; however, little is known about how these colors evolved. Here, we examine how closely related species and populations of Bicyclus butterflies have evolved violet structural color from brown-pigmented ancestors with UV structural color.We used artificial selection on a laboratory model butterfly, B. anynana, to evolve violet scales from UV brown scales and compared the mechanism of violet color production with that of two other Bicyclus species, Bicyclus sambulos and Bicyclus medontias, which have evolved violet/blue scales independently via natural selection. The UV reflectance peak of B. anynana brown scales shifted to violet over six generations of artificial selection (i.e., in less than 1 y) as the result of an increase in the thickness of the lower lamina in ground scales. Similar scale structures and the same mechanism for producing violet/blue structural colors were found in the other Bicyclus species. This work shows that populations harbor large amounts of standing genetic variation that can lead to rapid evolution of scales ' structural color via slight modifications to the scales' physical dimensions.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Vol/bind111
Udgave nummer33
Sider (fra-til)12109-12114
Antal sider6
ISSN0027-8424
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 19 aug. 2014
Eksternt udgivetJa

ID: 229316257