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Childhood body mass index and risk of schizophrenia in relation to childhood age, sex and age of first contact with schizophrenia

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Childhood body mass index and risk of schizophrenia in relation to childhood age, sex and age of first contact with schizophrenia. / Sørensen, H J; Gamborg, M; Sørensen, T I A; Baker, J L; Mortensen, E L.

I: European Psychiatry, Bind 34, 04.2016, s. 64-9.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningfagfællebedømt

Harvard

Sørensen, HJ, Gamborg, M, Sørensen, TIA, Baker, JL & Mortensen, EL 2016, 'Childhood body mass index and risk of schizophrenia in relation to childhood age, sex and age of first contact with schizophrenia', European Psychiatry, bind 34, s. 64-9. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.eurpsy.2016.01.2425

APA

Sørensen, H. J., Gamborg, M., Sørensen, T. I. A., Baker, J. L., & Mortensen, E. L. (2016). Childhood body mass index and risk of schizophrenia in relation to childhood age, sex and age of first contact with schizophrenia. European Psychiatry, 34, 64-9. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.eurpsy.2016.01.2425

Vancouver

Sørensen HJ, Gamborg M, Sørensen TIA, Baker JL, Mortensen EL. Childhood body mass index and risk of schizophrenia in relation to childhood age, sex and age of first contact with schizophrenia. European Psychiatry. 2016 apr;34:64-9. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.eurpsy.2016.01.2425

Author

Sørensen, H J ; Gamborg, M ; Sørensen, T I A ; Baker, J L ; Mortensen, E L. / Childhood body mass index and risk of schizophrenia in relation to childhood age, sex and age of first contact with schizophrenia. I: European Psychiatry. 2016 ; Bind 34. s. 64-9.

Bibtex

@article{99760822d40548f49d9aff68cc19fd72,
title = "Childhood body mass index and risk of schizophrenia in relation to childhood age, sex and age of first contact with schizophrenia",
abstract = "UNLABELLED: Childhood leanness is associated with an increased risk of schizophrenia, but the effects of gender, age at anthropometric measurements and age at first diagnosis on this relationship are unclear. The present study aimed at elucidating these associations.METHODS: Population-based cohort study with childhood anthropometric measures obtained annually from the age of 7 to 13 years in 253,353 Danes born 1930-1976 and followed to 31 December 2010. During this period, 4936 were registered with schizophrenia. The associations of childhood BMI with risk of schizophrenia were estimated with Cox regression models.RESULTS: Childhood BMI was significantly inversely associated with risk of schizophrenia, however with different patterns among boys and girls. In boys, childhood BMI had an inverse non-linear association with schizophrenia risk dependent on age at diagnosis; in particular, a surprisingly strong association was found between leanness and later onset of schizophrenia. In girls, the risk of schizophrenia decreased linearly with increasing BMI z-score (HR: 0.93; 95% CI: 0.88-0.98). In both boys and girls, birth weight was inversely associated with later risk. In girls, but not in boys, birth weight appeared to significantly modify the associations; there was a somewhat stronger inverse association in the lowest birth weight category.CONCLUSION: Birth weight as well as childhood BMI at ages 7 through 13 years is associated with risk of schizophrenia in both genders, but with a particular high risk of late-onset in lean boys irrespective of birth weight, and in lean girls with low birth weight. If replicated, these observations may inform preventive efforts build on schizophrenia trajectories rooted in early life.",
author = "S{\o}rensen, {H J} and M Gamborg and S{\o}rensen, {T I A} and Baker, {J L} and Mortensen, {E L}",
note = "Copyright {\textcopyright} 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.",
year = "2016",
month = apr,
doi = "10.1016/j.eurpsy.2016.01.2425",
language = "English",
volume = "34",
pages = "64--9",
journal = "European Psychiatry",
issn = "0924-9338",
publisher = "Elsevier Masson",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Childhood body mass index and risk of schizophrenia in relation to childhood age, sex and age of first contact with schizophrenia

AU - Sørensen, H J

AU - Gamborg, M

AU - Sørensen, T I A

AU - Baker, J L

AU - Mortensen, E L

N1 - Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

PY - 2016/4

Y1 - 2016/4

N2 - UNLABELLED: Childhood leanness is associated with an increased risk of schizophrenia, but the effects of gender, age at anthropometric measurements and age at first diagnosis on this relationship are unclear. The present study aimed at elucidating these associations.METHODS: Population-based cohort study with childhood anthropometric measures obtained annually from the age of 7 to 13 years in 253,353 Danes born 1930-1976 and followed to 31 December 2010. During this period, 4936 were registered with schizophrenia. The associations of childhood BMI with risk of schizophrenia were estimated with Cox regression models.RESULTS: Childhood BMI was significantly inversely associated with risk of schizophrenia, however with different patterns among boys and girls. In boys, childhood BMI had an inverse non-linear association with schizophrenia risk dependent on age at diagnosis; in particular, a surprisingly strong association was found between leanness and later onset of schizophrenia. In girls, the risk of schizophrenia decreased linearly with increasing BMI z-score (HR: 0.93; 95% CI: 0.88-0.98). In both boys and girls, birth weight was inversely associated with later risk. In girls, but not in boys, birth weight appeared to significantly modify the associations; there was a somewhat stronger inverse association in the lowest birth weight category.CONCLUSION: Birth weight as well as childhood BMI at ages 7 through 13 years is associated with risk of schizophrenia in both genders, but with a particular high risk of late-onset in lean boys irrespective of birth weight, and in lean girls with low birth weight. If replicated, these observations may inform preventive efforts build on schizophrenia trajectories rooted in early life.

AB - UNLABELLED: Childhood leanness is associated with an increased risk of schizophrenia, but the effects of gender, age at anthropometric measurements and age at first diagnosis on this relationship are unclear. The present study aimed at elucidating these associations.METHODS: Population-based cohort study with childhood anthropometric measures obtained annually from the age of 7 to 13 years in 253,353 Danes born 1930-1976 and followed to 31 December 2010. During this period, 4936 were registered with schizophrenia. The associations of childhood BMI with risk of schizophrenia were estimated with Cox regression models.RESULTS: Childhood BMI was significantly inversely associated with risk of schizophrenia, however with different patterns among boys and girls. In boys, childhood BMI had an inverse non-linear association with schizophrenia risk dependent on age at diagnosis; in particular, a surprisingly strong association was found between leanness and later onset of schizophrenia. In girls, the risk of schizophrenia decreased linearly with increasing BMI z-score (HR: 0.93; 95% CI: 0.88-0.98). In both boys and girls, birth weight was inversely associated with later risk. In girls, but not in boys, birth weight appeared to significantly modify the associations; there was a somewhat stronger inverse association in the lowest birth weight category.CONCLUSION: Birth weight as well as childhood BMI at ages 7 through 13 years is associated with risk of schizophrenia in both genders, but with a particular high risk of late-onset in lean boys irrespective of birth weight, and in lean girls with low birth weight. If replicated, these observations may inform preventive efforts build on schizophrenia trajectories rooted in early life.

U2 - 10.1016/j.eurpsy.2016.01.2425

DO - 10.1016/j.eurpsy.2016.01.2425

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 26967349

VL - 34

SP - 64

EP - 69

JO - European Psychiatry

JF - European Psychiatry

SN - 0924-9338

ER -

ID: 159743639