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Denmark: A not so radical radical left wing party.

Publikation: Bidrag til bog/antologi/rapportBidrag til bog/antologiForskningfagfællebedømt

Standard

Denmark: A not so radical radical left wing party. / Bischoff, Carina; Kosiara-Pedersen, Karina.

Palgrave Handbook of Radical Left Parties in Europe. Palgrave Macmillan, 2020.

Publikation: Bidrag til bog/antologi/rapportBidrag til bog/antologiForskningfagfællebedømt

Harvard

Bischoff, C & Kosiara-Pedersen, K 2020, Denmark: A not so radical radical left wing party. i Palgrave Handbook of Radical Left Parties in Europe. Palgrave Macmillan.

APA

Bischoff, C., & Kosiara-Pedersen, K. (Accepteret/In press). Denmark: A not so radical radical left wing party. I Palgrave Handbook of Radical Left Parties in Europe Palgrave Macmillan.

Vancouver

Bischoff C, Kosiara-Pedersen K. Denmark: A not so radical radical left wing party. I Palgrave Handbook of Radical Left Parties in Europe. Palgrave Macmillan. 2020

Author

Bischoff, Carina ; Kosiara-Pedersen, Karina. / Denmark: A not so radical radical left wing party. Palgrave Handbook of Radical Left Parties in Europe. Palgrave Macmillan, 2020.

Bibtex

@inbook{28f0918e218b42408365094384397dc0,
title = "Denmark: A not so radical radical left wing party.",
abstract = "This chapter focusses on the Red-Green Alliance (RGA, Enhedslisten), which is the only decidedly radical left party currently represented in the Danish party system. Historically, we can trace its origins back to parties from the beginning of the 20th century. In its current form, however, it was founded as a merger of three parties on the extreme left in 1989. Until 2011, its electoral support barely sufficed to win seats in parliament. However, since then, it has consistently won 7-8 per cent of the vote and become a player to be reckoned with in the parliamentary arena. The Red-Green Alliance has particularly appealed to younger voters, those working in the public sector, residents in the big cities and those who have strong left as well as green ideology. In Parliament, it has supported the Social Democratic led center-left governments, and also entered into political agreements with an increasing degree of pragmatism. Its success has not only been electoral, but also organizational. Notwithstanding its origins as a merger of three distinct parties, and the (limited) institutionalized factionalism reflected in its organizational structure, it has achieved a remarkable degree of unity. It has resisted trends towards greater centralization of power and generally retained commitment to internal democratic processes.",
author = "Carina Bischoff and Karina Kosiara-Pedersen",
year = "2020",
language = "English",
booktitle = "Palgrave Handbook of Radical Left Parties in Europe",
publisher = "Palgrave Macmillan",
address = "United Kingdom",

}

RIS

TY - CHAP

T1 - Denmark: A not so radical radical left wing party.

AU - Bischoff, Carina

AU - Kosiara-Pedersen, Karina

PY - 2020

Y1 - 2020

N2 - This chapter focusses on the Red-Green Alliance (RGA, Enhedslisten), which is the only decidedly radical left party currently represented in the Danish party system. Historically, we can trace its origins back to parties from the beginning of the 20th century. In its current form, however, it was founded as a merger of three parties on the extreme left in 1989. Until 2011, its electoral support barely sufficed to win seats in parliament. However, since then, it has consistently won 7-8 per cent of the vote and become a player to be reckoned with in the parliamentary arena. The Red-Green Alliance has particularly appealed to younger voters, those working in the public sector, residents in the big cities and those who have strong left as well as green ideology. In Parliament, it has supported the Social Democratic led center-left governments, and also entered into political agreements with an increasing degree of pragmatism. Its success has not only been electoral, but also organizational. Notwithstanding its origins as a merger of three distinct parties, and the (limited) institutionalized factionalism reflected in its organizational structure, it has achieved a remarkable degree of unity. It has resisted trends towards greater centralization of power and generally retained commitment to internal democratic processes.

AB - This chapter focusses on the Red-Green Alliance (RGA, Enhedslisten), which is the only decidedly radical left party currently represented in the Danish party system. Historically, we can trace its origins back to parties from the beginning of the 20th century. In its current form, however, it was founded as a merger of three parties on the extreme left in 1989. Until 2011, its electoral support barely sufficed to win seats in parliament. However, since then, it has consistently won 7-8 per cent of the vote and become a player to be reckoned with in the parliamentary arena. The Red-Green Alliance has particularly appealed to younger voters, those working in the public sector, residents in the big cities and those who have strong left as well as green ideology. In Parliament, it has supported the Social Democratic led center-left governments, and also entered into political agreements with an increasing degree of pragmatism. Its success has not only been electoral, but also organizational. Notwithstanding its origins as a merger of three distinct parties, and the (limited) institutionalized factionalism reflected in its organizational structure, it has achieved a remarkable degree of unity. It has resisted trends towards greater centralization of power and generally retained commitment to internal democratic processes.

M3 - Book chapter

BT - Palgrave Handbook of Radical Left Parties in Europe

PB - Palgrave Macmillan

ER -

ID: 233650442