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Dietary protein intake and quality in early life: impact on growth and obesity

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftReviewForskningfagfællebedømt

Standard

Dietary protein intake and quality in early life : impact on growth and obesity. / Lind, Mads Vendelbo; Larnkjær, Anni; Mølgaard, Christian; Michaelsen, Kim F.

I: Current Opinion in Clinical Nutrition and Metabolic Care, Bind 20, Nr. 1, 2017, s. 71-76.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftReviewForskningfagfællebedømt

Harvard

Lind, MV, Larnkjær, A, Mølgaard, C & Michaelsen, KF 2017, 'Dietary protein intake and quality in early life: impact on growth and obesity', Current Opinion in Clinical Nutrition and Metabolic Care, bind 20, nr. 1, s. 71-76. https://doi.org/10.1097/MCO.0000000000000338

APA

Lind, M. V., Larnkjær, A., Mølgaard, C., & Michaelsen, K. F. (2017). Dietary protein intake and quality in early life: impact on growth and obesity. Current Opinion in Clinical Nutrition and Metabolic Care, 20(1), 71-76. https://doi.org/10.1097/MCO.0000000000000338

Vancouver

Lind MV, Larnkjær A, Mølgaard C, Michaelsen KF. Dietary protein intake and quality in early life: impact on growth and obesity. Current Opinion in Clinical Nutrition and Metabolic Care. 2017;20(1):71-76. https://doi.org/10.1097/MCO.0000000000000338

Author

Lind, Mads Vendelbo ; Larnkjær, Anni ; Mølgaard, Christian ; Michaelsen, Kim F. / Dietary protein intake and quality in early life : impact on growth and obesity. I: Current Opinion in Clinical Nutrition and Metabolic Care. 2017 ; Bind 20, Nr. 1. s. 71-76.

Bibtex

@article{bd5908067eed4b06b1f31c5342391bbe,
title = "Dietary protein intake and quality in early life: impact on growth and obesity",
abstract = "PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Obesity is an increasing problem and high-protein intake early in life seems to increase later risk of obesity. This review summarizes recent publications in the area including observational and intervention studies and publications on underlying mechanisms.RECENT FINDINGS: Recent observational and randomized controlled trials confirmed that high-protein intake in early life seems to increase early weight gain and the risk of later overweight and obesity. Recent studies have looked at the effect of different sources of protein, and especially high-animal protein intake seems to have an effect on obesity. Specific amino acids, such as leucine, have also been implicated in increasing later obesity risk maybe via specific actions on insulin-like growth factor I. Furthermore, additional underlying mechanisms including epigenetics have been linked to long-term obesogenic programming. Finally, infants with catch-up growth or specific genotypes might be particularly vulnerable to high-protein intake.SUMMARY: Recent studies confirm the associations between high-protein intake during the first 2 years and later obesity. Furthermore, knowledge of the mechanisms involved and the role of different dietary protein sources and amino acids has increased, but intervention studies are needed to confirm the mechanisms. Avoiding high-protein intake in early life holds promise as a preventive strategy for childhood obesity.",
keywords = "Faculty of Science, Complementary feeding, Growth, Infancy, Obesity, Protein sources",
author = "Lind, {Mads Vendelbo} and Anni Larnkj{\ae}r and Christian M{\o}lgaard and Michaelsen, {Kim F.}",
note = "CURIS 2017 NEXS 014",
year = "2017",
doi = "10.1097/MCO.0000000000000338",
language = "English",
volume = "20",
pages = "71--76",
journal = "Current Opinion in Clinical Nutrition and Metabolic Care",
issn = "1363-1950",
publisher = "Lippincott Williams & Wilkins",
number = "1",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Dietary protein intake and quality in early life

T2 - impact on growth and obesity

AU - Lind, Mads Vendelbo

AU - Larnkjær, Anni

AU - Mølgaard, Christian

AU - Michaelsen, Kim F.

N1 - CURIS 2017 NEXS 014

PY - 2017

Y1 - 2017

N2 - PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Obesity is an increasing problem and high-protein intake early in life seems to increase later risk of obesity. This review summarizes recent publications in the area including observational and intervention studies and publications on underlying mechanisms.RECENT FINDINGS: Recent observational and randomized controlled trials confirmed that high-protein intake in early life seems to increase early weight gain and the risk of later overweight and obesity. Recent studies have looked at the effect of different sources of protein, and especially high-animal protein intake seems to have an effect on obesity. Specific amino acids, such as leucine, have also been implicated in increasing later obesity risk maybe via specific actions on insulin-like growth factor I. Furthermore, additional underlying mechanisms including epigenetics have been linked to long-term obesogenic programming. Finally, infants with catch-up growth or specific genotypes might be particularly vulnerable to high-protein intake.SUMMARY: Recent studies confirm the associations between high-protein intake during the first 2 years and later obesity. Furthermore, knowledge of the mechanisms involved and the role of different dietary protein sources and amino acids has increased, but intervention studies are needed to confirm the mechanisms. Avoiding high-protein intake in early life holds promise as a preventive strategy for childhood obesity.

AB - PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Obesity is an increasing problem and high-protein intake early in life seems to increase later risk of obesity. This review summarizes recent publications in the area including observational and intervention studies and publications on underlying mechanisms.RECENT FINDINGS: Recent observational and randomized controlled trials confirmed that high-protein intake in early life seems to increase early weight gain and the risk of later overweight and obesity. Recent studies have looked at the effect of different sources of protein, and especially high-animal protein intake seems to have an effect on obesity. Specific amino acids, such as leucine, have also been implicated in increasing later obesity risk maybe via specific actions on insulin-like growth factor I. Furthermore, additional underlying mechanisms including epigenetics have been linked to long-term obesogenic programming. Finally, infants with catch-up growth or specific genotypes might be particularly vulnerable to high-protein intake.SUMMARY: Recent studies confirm the associations between high-protein intake during the first 2 years and later obesity. Furthermore, knowledge of the mechanisms involved and the role of different dietary protein sources and amino acids has increased, but intervention studies are needed to confirm the mechanisms. Avoiding high-protein intake in early life holds promise as a preventive strategy for childhood obesity.

KW - Faculty of Science

KW - Complementary feeding

KW - Growth

KW - Infancy

KW - Obesity

KW - Protein sources

U2 - 10.1097/MCO.0000000000000338

DO - 10.1097/MCO.0000000000000338

M3 - Review

C2 - 27749711

VL - 20

SP - 71

EP - 76

JO - Current Opinion in Clinical Nutrition and Metabolic Care

JF - Current Opinion in Clinical Nutrition and Metabolic Care

SN - 1363-1950

IS - 1

ER -

ID: 167520354