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'Do you think you suffer from depression?' Reevaluating the use of a single item question for the screening of depression in older primary care patients

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningfagfællebedømt

Standard

'Do you think you suffer from depression?' Reevaluating the use of a single item question for the screening of depression in older primary care patients. / Ayalon, Liat; Goldfracht, Margalit; Bech, Per.

I: International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, Bind 25, Nr. 5, 01.05.2010, s. 497-502.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningfagfællebedømt

Harvard

Ayalon, L, Goldfracht, M & Bech, P 2010, ''Do you think you suffer from depression?' Reevaluating the use of a single item question for the screening of depression in older primary care patients', International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, bind 25, nr. 5, s. 497-502. https://doi.org/10.1002/gps.2368

APA

Ayalon, L., Goldfracht, M., & Bech, P. (2010). 'Do you think you suffer from depression?' Reevaluating the use of a single item question for the screening of depression in older primary care patients. International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, 25(5), 497-502. https://doi.org/10.1002/gps.2368

Vancouver

Ayalon L, Goldfracht M, Bech P. 'Do you think you suffer from depression?' Reevaluating the use of a single item question for the screening of depression in older primary care patients. International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry. 2010 maj 1;25(5):497-502. https://doi.org/10.1002/gps.2368

Author

Ayalon, Liat ; Goldfracht, Margalit ; Bech, Per. / 'Do you think you suffer from depression?' Reevaluating the use of a single item question for the screening of depression in older primary care patients. I: International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry. 2010 ; Bind 25, Nr. 5. s. 497-502.

Bibtex

@article{24590891394549ddb0f121737555714c,
title = "'Do you think you suffer from depression?' Reevaluating the use of a single item question for the screening of depression in older primary care patients",
abstract = "OBJECTIVES: The majority of older adults seek depression treatment in primary care. Despite impressive efforts to integrate depression treatment into primary care, depression often remains undetected. The overall goal of the present study was to compare a single item screening for depression to existing depression screening tools. METHODS: A cross sectional sample of 153 older primary care patients. Participants completed several depression-screening measures (e.g. a single depression screen, Patient Health Questionnaire-9, Major Depression Inventory, Visual Analogue Scale). Measures were evaluated against a depression diagnosis made by the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV. RESULTS: Overall, 3.9{\%} of the sample was diagnosed with depression. The most notable finding was that the single-item question, 'do you think you suffer from depression?' had as good or better sensitivity (83{\%}) than all other screens. Nonetheless, its specificity of 83{\%} suggested that it has to be followed up by a through diagnostic interview. Additional sensitivity analyses concerning the use of a single depression item taken directly from the depression screening measures supported this finding. CONCLUSIONS: An easy way to detect depression in older primary care patients would be asking the single question, 'do you think you suffer from depression?'",
author = "Liat Ayalon and Margalit Goldfracht and Per Bech",
year = "2010",
month = "5",
day = "1",
doi = "http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/gps.2368",
language = "English",
volume = "25",
pages = "497--502",
journal = "International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry",
issn = "0885-6230",
publisher = "JohnWiley & Sons Ltd",
number = "5",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - 'Do you think you suffer from depression?' Reevaluating the use of a single item question for the screening of depression in older primary care patients

AU - Ayalon, Liat

AU - Goldfracht, Margalit

AU - Bech, Per

PY - 2010/5/1

Y1 - 2010/5/1

N2 - OBJECTIVES: The majority of older adults seek depression treatment in primary care. Despite impressive efforts to integrate depression treatment into primary care, depression often remains undetected. The overall goal of the present study was to compare a single item screening for depression to existing depression screening tools. METHODS: A cross sectional sample of 153 older primary care patients. Participants completed several depression-screening measures (e.g. a single depression screen, Patient Health Questionnaire-9, Major Depression Inventory, Visual Analogue Scale). Measures were evaluated against a depression diagnosis made by the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV. RESULTS: Overall, 3.9% of the sample was diagnosed with depression. The most notable finding was that the single-item question, 'do you think you suffer from depression?' had as good or better sensitivity (83%) than all other screens. Nonetheless, its specificity of 83% suggested that it has to be followed up by a through diagnostic interview. Additional sensitivity analyses concerning the use of a single depression item taken directly from the depression screening measures supported this finding. CONCLUSIONS: An easy way to detect depression in older primary care patients would be asking the single question, 'do you think you suffer from depression?'

AB - OBJECTIVES: The majority of older adults seek depression treatment in primary care. Despite impressive efforts to integrate depression treatment into primary care, depression often remains undetected. The overall goal of the present study was to compare a single item screening for depression to existing depression screening tools. METHODS: A cross sectional sample of 153 older primary care patients. Participants completed several depression-screening measures (e.g. a single depression screen, Patient Health Questionnaire-9, Major Depression Inventory, Visual Analogue Scale). Measures were evaluated against a depression diagnosis made by the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV. RESULTS: Overall, 3.9% of the sample was diagnosed with depression. The most notable finding was that the single-item question, 'do you think you suffer from depression?' had as good or better sensitivity (83%) than all other screens. Nonetheless, its specificity of 83% suggested that it has to be followed up by a through diagnostic interview. Additional sensitivity analyses concerning the use of a single depression item taken directly from the depression screening measures supported this finding. CONCLUSIONS: An easy way to detect depression in older primary care patients would be asking the single question, 'do you think you suffer from depression?'

U2 - http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/gps.2368

DO - http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/gps.2368

M3 - Journal article

VL - 25

SP - 497

EP - 502

JO - International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry

JF - International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry

SN - 0885-6230

IS - 5

ER -

ID: 34134240