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Effects of competitive asymmetry on a local density model of plant interference

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Effects of competitive asymmetry on a local density model of plant interference. / Pacala, S. W.; Weiner, J.

I: Journal of Theoretical Biology, Bind 149, Nr. 2, 21.03.1991, s. 165-179.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikel

Harvard

Pacala, SW & Weiner, J 1991, 'Effects of competitive asymmetry on a local density model of plant interference', Journal of Theoretical Biology, bind 149, nr. 2, s. 165-179. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0022-5193(05)80275-9

APA

Pacala, S. W., & Weiner, J. (1991). Effects of competitive asymmetry on a local density model of plant interference. Journal of Theoretical Biology, 149(2), 165-179. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0022-5193(05)80275-9

Vancouver

Pacala SW, Weiner J. Effects of competitive asymmetry on a local density model of plant interference. Journal of Theoretical Biology. 1991 mar 21;149(2):165-179. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0022-5193(05)80275-9

Author

Pacala, S. W. ; Weiner, J. / Effects of competitive asymmetry on a local density model of plant interference. I: Journal of Theoretical Biology. 1991 ; Bind 149, Nr. 2. s. 165-179.

Bibtex

@article{89a485954d45424c8fac0160d4a8c024,
title = "Effects of competitive asymmetry on a local density model of plant interference",
abstract = "Although competition between plants is usually asymmetric (i.e. larger plants have a disproportionate effect on smaller plants) almost all models of plant competition at the local level have assumed symmetric competition. We add a simple version of competitive asymmetry to the local density neighborhood models of plant interference and population dynamics developed by Pacala & Silander (1985, Am. Nat.125, 385-411; 1987, Oikos48, 217-224) by assuming that plants within a neighborhood can be put in a linear dominance hierarchy based upon their initial size. The size of a focal plant is a function of the number of dominant and the number of subordinate neighbors within its neighborhood, with subordinate neighbors having less of an effect than dominant ones. Asymmetry prevents precipitous changes in focal plant size with changes in local density, making the relationship between focal plant size and local density hyperbolic, even if the symmetric model is not hyperbolic. Thus, asymmetry makes the model conform to the law of constant final yield, irrespective of the form of the relationship between plant size and local crowding. Asymmetry also prevents population dynamic oscillations in the model in cases in which it would occur in the absence of asymmetry. The results show that asymmetry has major effects on a model of local interference in plants, and point to the importance of including it in such models.",
author = "Pacala, {S. W.} and J. Weiner",
year = "1991",
month = "3",
day = "21",
doi = "10.1016/S0022-5193(05)80275-9",
language = "English",
volume = "149",
pages = "165--179",
journal = "Journal of Theoretical Biology",
issn = "0022-5193",
publisher = "Academic Press",
number = "2",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Effects of competitive asymmetry on a local density model of plant interference

AU - Pacala, S. W.

AU - Weiner, J.

PY - 1991/3/21

Y1 - 1991/3/21

N2 - Although competition between plants is usually asymmetric (i.e. larger plants have a disproportionate effect on smaller plants) almost all models of plant competition at the local level have assumed symmetric competition. We add a simple version of competitive asymmetry to the local density neighborhood models of plant interference and population dynamics developed by Pacala & Silander (1985, Am. Nat.125, 385-411; 1987, Oikos48, 217-224) by assuming that plants within a neighborhood can be put in a linear dominance hierarchy based upon their initial size. The size of a focal plant is a function of the number of dominant and the number of subordinate neighbors within its neighborhood, with subordinate neighbors having less of an effect than dominant ones. Asymmetry prevents precipitous changes in focal plant size with changes in local density, making the relationship between focal plant size and local density hyperbolic, even if the symmetric model is not hyperbolic. Thus, asymmetry makes the model conform to the law of constant final yield, irrespective of the form of the relationship between plant size and local crowding. Asymmetry also prevents population dynamic oscillations in the model in cases in which it would occur in the absence of asymmetry. The results show that asymmetry has major effects on a model of local interference in plants, and point to the importance of including it in such models.

AB - Although competition between plants is usually asymmetric (i.e. larger plants have a disproportionate effect on smaller plants) almost all models of plant competition at the local level have assumed symmetric competition. We add a simple version of competitive asymmetry to the local density neighborhood models of plant interference and population dynamics developed by Pacala & Silander (1985, Am. Nat.125, 385-411; 1987, Oikos48, 217-224) by assuming that plants within a neighborhood can be put in a linear dominance hierarchy based upon their initial size. The size of a focal plant is a function of the number of dominant and the number of subordinate neighbors within its neighborhood, with subordinate neighbors having less of an effect than dominant ones. Asymmetry prevents precipitous changes in focal plant size with changes in local density, making the relationship between focal plant size and local density hyperbolic, even if the symmetric model is not hyperbolic. Thus, asymmetry makes the model conform to the law of constant final yield, irrespective of the form of the relationship between plant size and local crowding. Asymmetry also prevents population dynamic oscillations in the model in cases in which it would occur in the absence of asymmetry. The results show that asymmetry has major effects on a model of local interference in plants, and point to the importance of including it in such models.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0025919150&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/S0022-5193(05)80275-9

DO - 10.1016/S0022-5193(05)80275-9

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 2062091

AN - SCOPUS:0025919150

VL - 149

SP - 165

EP - 179

JO - Journal of Theoretical Biology

JF - Journal of Theoretical Biology

SN - 0022-5193

IS - 2

ER -

ID: 224653007