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Emerging trends in gerontology and geriatrics: implications for the self-care of the elderly.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningfagfællebedømt

Standard

Emerging trends in gerontology and geriatrics: implications for the self-care of the elderly. / Hickey, T; Dean, K; Holstein, B E.

I: Social Science & Medicine, Bind 23, Nr. 12, 1986, s. 1363-9.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningfagfællebedømt

Harvard

Hickey, T, Dean, K & Holstein, BE 1986, 'Emerging trends in gerontology and geriatrics: implications for the self-care of the elderly.', Social Science & Medicine, bind 23, nr. 12, s. 1363-9.

APA

Hickey, T., Dean, K., & Holstein, B. E. (1986). Emerging trends in gerontology and geriatrics: implications for the self-care of the elderly. Social Science & Medicine, 23(12), 1363-9.

Vancouver

Hickey T, Dean K, Holstein BE. Emerging trends in gerontology and geriatrics: implications for the self-care of the elderly. Social Science & Medicine. 1986;23(12):1363-9.

Author

Hickey, T ; Dean, K ; Holstein, B E. / Emerging trends in gerontology and geriatrics: implications for the self-care of the elderly. I: Social Science & Medicine. 1986 ; Bind 23, Nr. 12. s. 1363-9.

Bibtex

@article{a2decfa09b6b11dd86a6000ea68e967b,
title = "Emerging trends in gerontology and geriatrics: implications for the self-care of the elderly.",
abstract = "Increases in the world's older population have posed a significant challenge to available health care resources. For many older people, informal initiatives represent a necessary, rather than an optional health care strategy in the absence of alternatives. Those individuals with the greatest health and economic dependencies are often held responsible for their reliance on subsidized long-term care services. This tendency to blame the victim appears to transcend fundamental philosophic differences which have traditionally distinguished some collectivist and individualist societies. Although health care has been viewed traditionally by health professionals as their domain, self-care and lay initiatives have recently been recognized by professionals as important to the health care of different population groups including older people. The concept of self-care has been used in various ways by different people to describe a wide range of personal health behaviors encompassing lay care, self-help, enlightened consumerism, and various preventive measures as antidotes to the impairments of old age. This paper reports some of the outcomes of an international project which reviewed geriatric self-care in different countries and health care systems. Various influences on the evolution of interest in geriatric self-care were identified including: similarities and differences in health care systems: demographic changes; cohort differences; the emergence of professionals with specialized training in geriatric health care; and, the salience of biomedical models in addressing the health problems of aging. The role of professionals, especially those trained in geriatrics, is examined with an acknowledgment of the importance of a self-care strategy that is independent of professional dominance.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)",
author = "T Hickey and K Dean and Holstein, {B E}",
note = "Keywords: Aged; Demography; Geriatrics; Health Services for the Aged; Humans; Public Policy; Self Care; Social Environment",
year = "1986",
language = "English",
volume = "23",
pages = "1363--9",
journal = "Social Science & Medicine",
issn = "0277-9536",
publisher = "Pergamon Press",
number = "12",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Emerging trends in gerontology and geriatrics: implications for the self-care of the elderly.

AU - Hickey, T

AU - Dean, K

AU - Holstein, B E

N1 - Keywords: Aged; Demography; Geriatrics; Health Services for the Aged; Humans; Public Policy; Self Care; Social Environment

PY - 1986

Y1 - 1986

N2 - Increases in the world's older population have posed a significant challenge to available health care resources. For many older people, informal initiatives represent a necessary, rather than an optional health care strategy in the absence of alternatives. Those individuals with the greatest health and economic dependencies are often held responsible for their reliance on subsidized long-term care services. This tendency to blame the victim appears to transcend fundamental philosophic differences which have traditionally distinguished some collectivist and individualist societies. Although health care has been viewed traditionally by health professionals as their domain, self-care and lay initiatives have recently been recognized by professionals as important to the health care of different population groups including older people. The concept of self-care has been used in various ways by different people to describe a wide range of personal health behaviors encompassing lay care, self-help, enlightened consumerism, and various preventive measures as antidotes to the impairments of old age. This paper reports some of the outcomes of an international project which reviewed geriatric self-care in different countries and health care systems. Various influences on the evolution of interest in geriatric self-care were identified including: similarities and differences in health care systems: demographic changes; cohort differences; the emergence of professionals with specialized training in geriatric health care; and, the salience of biomedical models in addressing the health problems of aging. The role of professionals, especially those trained in geriatrics, is examined with an acknowledgment of the importance of a self-care strategy that is independent of professional dominance.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

AB - Increases in the world's older population have posed a significant challenge to available health care resources. For many older people, informal initiatives represent a necessary, rather than an optional health care strategy in the absence of alternatives. Those individuals with the greatest health and economic dependencies are often held responsible for their reliance on subsidized long-term care services. This tendency to blame the victim appears to transcend fundamental philosophic differences which have traditionally distinguished some collectivist and individualist societies. Although health care has been viewed traditionally by health professionals as their domain, self-care and lay initiatives have recently been recognized by professionals as important to the health care of different population groups including older people. The concept of self-care has been used in various ways by different people to describe a wide range of personal health behaviors encompassing lay care, self-help, enlightened consumerism, and various preventive measures as antidotes to the impairments of old age. This paper reports some of the outcomes of an international project which reviewed geriatric self-care in different countries and health care systems. Various influences on the evolution of interest in geriatric self-care were identified including: similarities and differences in health care systems: demographic changes; cohort differences; the emergence of professionals with specialized training in geriatric health care; and, the salience of biomedical models in addressing the health problems of aging. The role of professionals, especially those trained in geriatrics, is examined with an acknowledgment of the importance of a self-care strategy that is independent of professional dominance.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 3823991

VL - 23

SP - 1363

EP - 1369

JO - Social Science & Medicine

JF - Social Science & Medicine

SN - 0277-9536

IS - 12

ER -

ID: 6629472