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Food allergy to apple and specific immunotherapy with birch pollen

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningfagfællebedømt

Standard

Food allergy to apple and specific immunotherapy with birch pollen. / Hansen, Kirsten Skamstrup; Khinchi, Marianne Søndergaard; Skov, Per Stahl; Bindslev-Jensen, Carsten; Poulsen, Lars K.; Malling, Hans-Jørgen.

I: Molecular Nutrition & Food Research, Bind 48, Nr. 6, 11.2004, s. 441-8.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningfagfællebedømt

Harvard

Hansen, KS, Khinchi, MS, Skov, PS, Bindslev-Jensen, C, Poulsen, LK & Malling, H-J 2004, 'Food allergy to apple and specific immunotherapy with birch pollen', Molecular Nutrition & Food Research, bind 48, nr. 6, s. 441-8. https://doi.org/10.1002/mnfr.200400037

APA

Hansen, K. S., Khinchi, M. S., Skov, P. S., Bindslev-Jensen, C., Poulsen, L. K., & Malling, H-J. (2004). Food allergy to apple and specific immunotherapy with birch pollen. Molecular Nutrition & Food Research, 48(6), 441-8. https://doi.org/10.1002/mnfr.200400037

Vancouver

Hansen KS, Khinchi MS, Skov PS, Bindslev-Jensen C, Poulsen LK, Malling H-J. Food allergy to apple and specific immunotherapy with birch pollen. Molecular Nutrition & Food Research. 2004 nov;48(6):441-8. https://doi.org/10.1002/mnfr.200400037

Author

Hansen, Kirsten Skamstrup ; Khinchi, Marianne Søndergaard ; Skov, Per Stahl ; Bindslev-Jensen, Carsten ; Poulsen, Lars K. ; Malling, Hans-Jørgen. / Food allergy to apple and specific immunotherapy with birch pollen. I: Molecular Nutrition & Food Research. 2004 ; Bind 48, Nr. 6. s. 441-8.

Bibtex

@article{7e280eef637a439cad81d5311edc302a,
title = "Food allergy to apple and specific immunotherapy with birch pollen",
abstract = "Conflicting results concerning the effect of specific pollen immunotherapy (SIT) on allergy to plant foods have been reported. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of SIT using a birch pollen extract on food allergy with focus on allergy to apple. Seventy-four birch pollen-allergic patients were included in a double-blind, double-dummy, and placebo-controlled comparison of sublingual-swallow (SLIT) and subcutaneous (SCIT) administration of a birch pollen extract. Sixty-nine percent of these patients reported allergy to apple. The clinical reactivity to apple was evaluated by open oral challenges with fresh apple and a questionnaire. The immunoglobulin E (IgE)-reactivity was assessed by skin prick test (SPT), specific IgE, and leukocyte histamine release (HR). Forty patients were included in the final evaluation of the effect of SIT. The challenges were positive in 9 (SCIT), 6 (SLIT), and 8 (placebo) patients after treatment compared to 10, 4, and 10 patients, respectively, before SIT. The symptom scores to apple during challenges decreased in all groups, but only significantly in the placebo group (p = 0.03). As evaluated by the questionnaire, the severity of food allergy in general did not change and there were no differences between the groups. In spite of a significant effect on seasonal hay fever symptoms and use of medication and decrease in IgE-reactivity, SIT was not accompanied by a significant decrease in the severity of allergy to apple compared to placebo. Therefore, oral allergy syndrome (OAS) to apple should not be considered as a main criterion for selecting patients for birch pollen immunotherapy at present.",
keywords = "Adult, Allergens, Betula, Desensitization, Immunologic, Double-Blind Method, Female, Food Hypersensitivity, Humans, Immunoglobulin E, Immunotherapy, Male, Malus, Middle Aged, Pollen, Questionnaires, Skin Tests",
author = "Hansen, {Kirsten Skamstrup} and Khinchi, {Marianne S{\o}ndergaard} and Skov, {Per Stahl} and Carsten Bindslev-Jensen and Poulsen, {Lars K.} and Hans-J{\o}rgen Malling",
year = "2004",
month = "11",
doi = "10.1002/mnfr.200400037",
language = "English",
volume = "48",
pages = "441--8",
journal = "Molecular Nutrition & Food Research",
issn = "1613-4125",
publisher = "Wiley-VCH",
number = "6",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Food allergy to apple and specific immunotherapy with birch pollen

AU - Hansen, Kirsten Skamstrup

AU - Khinchi, Marianne Søndergaard

AU - Skov, Per Stahl

AU - Bindslev-Jensen, Carsten

AU - Poulsen, Lars K.

AU - Malling, Hans-Jørgen

PY - 2004/11

Y1 - 2004/11

N2 - Conflicting results concerning the effect of specific pollen immunotherapy (SIT) on allergy to plant foods have been reported. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of SIT using a birch pollen extract on food allergy with focus on allergy to apple. Seventy-four birch pollen-allergic patients were included in a double-blind, double-dummy, and placebo-controlled comparison of sublingual-swallow (SLIT) and subcutaneous (SCIT) administration of a birch pollen extract. Sixty-nine percent of these patients reported allergy to apple. The clinical reactivity to apple was evaluated by open oral challenges with fresh apple and a questionnaire. The immunoglobulin E (IgE)-reactivity was assessed by skin prick test (SPT), specific IgE, and leukocyte histamine release (HR). Forty patients were included in the final evaluation of the effect of SIT. The challenges were positive in 9 (SCIT), 6 (SLIT), and 8 (placebo) patients after treatment compared to 10, 4, and 10 patients, respectively, before SIT. The symptom scores to apple during challenges decreased in all groups, but only significantly in the placebo group (p = 0.03). As evaluated by the questionnaire, the severity of food allergy in general did not change and there were no differences between the groups. In spite of a significant effect on seasonal hay fever symptoms and use of medication and decrease in IgE-reactivity, SIT was not accompanied by a significant decrease in the severity of allergy to apple compared to placebo. Therefore, oral allergy syndrome (OAS) to apple should not be considered as a main criterion for selecting patients for birch pollen immunotherapy at present.

AB - Conflicting results concerning the effect of specific pollen immunotherapy (SIT) on allergy to plant foods have been reported. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of SIT using a birch pollen extract on food allergy with focus on allergy to apple. Seventy-four birch pollen-allergic patients were included in a double-blind, double-dummy, and placebo-controlled comparison of sublingual-swallow (SLIT) and subcutaneous (SCIT) administration of a birch pollen extract. Sixty-nine percent of these patients reported allergy to apple. The clinical reactivity to apple was evaluated by open oral challenges with fresh apple and a questionnaire. The immunoglobulin E (IgE)-reactivity was assessed by skin prick test (SPT), specific IgE, and leukocyte histamine release (HR). Forty patients were included in the final evaluation of the effect of SIT. The challenges were positive in 9 (SCIT), 6 (SLIT), and 8 (placebo) patients after treatment compared to 10, 4, and 10 patients, respectively, before SIT. The symptom scores to apple during challenges decreased in all groups, but only significantly in the placebo group (p = 0.03). As evaluated by the questionnaire, the severity of food allergy in general did not change and there were no differences between the groups. In spite of a significant effect on seasonal hay fever symptoms and use of medication and decrease in IgE-reactivity, SIT was not accompanied by a significant decrease in the severity of allergy to apple compared to placebo. Therefore, oral allergy syndrome (OAS) to apple should not be considered as a main criterion for selecting patients for birch pollen immunotherapy at present.

KW - Adult

KW - Allergens

KW - Betula

KW - Desensitization, Immunologic

KW - Double-Blind Method

KW - Female

KW - Food Hypersensitivity

KW - Humans

KW - Immunoglobulin E

KW - Immunotherapy

KW - Male

KW - Malus

KW - Middle Aged

KW - Pollen

KW - Questionnaires

KW - Skin Tests

U2 - 10.1002/mnfr.200400037

DO - 10.1002/mnfr.200400037

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 15508179

VL - 48

SP - 441

EP - 448

JO - Molecular Nutrition & Food Research

JF - Molecular Nutrition & Food Research

SN - 1613-4125

IS - 6

ER -

ID: 50844571