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High intensity and reduced volume training attenuates stress and recovery levels in elite swimmers

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High intensity and reduced volume training attenuates stress and recovery levels in elite swimmers. / Elbe, Anne-Marie; Rasmussen, Camilla P; Nielsen, Glen; Nordsborg, Nikolai Baastrup.

I: European Journal of Sport Science, Bind 16, Nr. 3, 2016, s. 344-349.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningfagfællebedømt

Harvard

Elbe, A-M, Rasmussen, CP, Nielsen, G & Nordsborg, NB 2016, 'High intensity and reduced volume training attenuates stress and recovery levels in elite swimmers', European Journal of Sport Science, bind 16, nr. 3, s. 344-349. https://doi.org/10.1080/17461391.2015.1028466

APA

Elbe, A-M., Rasmussen, C. P., Nielsen, G., & Nordsborg, N. B. (2016). High intensity and reduced volume training attenuates stress and recovery levels in elite swimmers. European Journal of Sport Science, 16(3), 344-349. https://doi.org/10.1080/17461391.2015.1028466

Vancouver

Elbe A-M, Rasmussen CP, Nielsen G, Nordsborg NB. High intensity and reduced volume training attenuates stress and recovery levels in elite swimmers. European Journal of Sport Science. 2016;16(3):344-349. https://doi.org/10.1080/17461391.2015.1028466

Author

Elbe, Anne-Marie ; Rasmussen, Camilla P ; Nielsen, Glen ; Nordsborg, Nikolai Baastrup. / High intensity and reduced volume training attenuates stress and recovery levels in elite swimmers. I: European Journal of Sport Science. 2016 ; Bind 16, Nr. 3. s. 344-349.

Bibtex

@article{12b44c866fc54a1a97c1ee1cedbdb472,
title = "High intensity and reduced volume training attenuates stress and recovery levels in elite swimmers",
abstract = "This study investigated the effect of increased high-intensity interval training (HIT) at the expense of total training volume on the stress and recovery levels of elite swimmers. Forty-one elite swimmers participated in the study and were randomly assigned to either a HIT or a control group (CON). Eleven swimmers did not complete the questionnaires. For 12 weeks both groups trained ~12 h per week. The amount of HIT was ~5 h vs. 1 h, and total distance was ~17 km vs. ~35 km per week for HIT and CON, respectively. HIT was performed as 6-10 × 10-30 s maximal effort interspersed by 2-4 min of rest. The Recovery Stress Questionnaire - Sport was used to measure the swimmers' stress and recovery levels. After the 12 week intervention, the general stress level was 16.6{\%} (2.6-30.7{\%}; mean and 95{\%} CI) lower and the general recovery level was 6.5{\%} (0.7-12.4{\%}) higher in HIT compared to the CON, after adjusting for baseline values. No significant effects could be observed in sports-specific stress or sports-specific recovery. The results indicate that increasing training intensity and reducing training volume for 12 weeks can reduce general stress and increase general recovery levels in competitive swimmers.",
author = "Anne-Marie Elbe and Rasmussen, {Camilla P} and Glen Nielsen and Nordsborg, {Nikolai Baastrup}",
note = "CURIS 2016 NEXS 088",
year = "2016",
doi = "10.1080/17461391.2015.1028466",
language = "English",
volume = "16",
pages = "344--349",
journal = "European Journal of Sport Science",
issn = "1746-1391",
publisher = "Taylor & Francis",
number = "3",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - High intensity and reduced volume training attenuates stress and recovery levels in elite swimmers

AU - Elbe, Anne-Marie

AU - Rasmussen, Camilla P

AU - Nielsen, Glen

AU - Nordsborg, Nikolai Baastrup

N1 - CURIS 2016 NEXS 088

PY - 2016

Y1 - 2016

N2 - This study investigated the effect of increased high-intensity interval training (HIT) at the expense of total training volume on the stress and recovery levels of elite swimmers. Forty-one elite swimmers participated in the study and were randomly assigned to either a HIT or a control group (CON). Eleven swimmers did not complete the questionnaires. For 12 weeks both groups trained ~12 h per week. The amount of HIT was ~5 h vs. 1 h, and total distance was ~17 km vs. ~35 km per week for HIT and CON, respectively. HIT was performed as 6-10 × 10-30 s maximal effort interspersed by 2-4 min of rest. The Recovery Stress Questionnaire - Sport was used to measure the swimmers' stress and recovery levels. After the 12 week intervention, the general stress level was 16.6% (2.6-30.7%; mean and 95% CI) lower and the general recovery level was 6.5% (0.7-12.4%) higher in HIT compared to the CON, after adjusting for baseline values. No significant effects could be observed in sports-specific stress or sports-specific recovery. The results indicate that increasing training intensity and reducing training volume for 12 weeks can reduce general stress and increase general recovery levels in competitive swimmers.

AB - This study investigated the effect of increased high-intensity interval training (HIT) at the expense of total training volume on the stress and recovery levels of elite swimmers. Forty-one elite swimmers participated in the study and were randomly assigned to either a HIT or a control group (CON). Eleven swimmers did not complete the questionnaires. For 12 weeks both groups trained ~12 h per week. The amount of HIT was ~5 h vs. 1 h, and total distance was ~17 km vs. ~35 km per week for HIT and CON, respectively. HIT was performed as 6-10 × 10-30 s maximal effort interspersed by 2-4 min of rest. The Recovery Stress Questionnaire - Sport was used to measure the swimmers' stress and recovery levels. After the 12 week intervention, the general stress level was 16.6% (2.6-30.7%; mean and 95% CI) lower and the general recovery level was 6.5% (0.7-12.4%) higher in HIT compared to the CON, after adjusting for baseline values. No significant effects could be observed in sports-specific stress or sports-specific recovery. The results indicate that increasing training intensity and reducing training volume for 12 weeks can reduce general stress and increase general recovery levels in competitive swimmers.

U2 - 10.1080/17461391.2015.1028466

DO - 10.1080/17461391.2015.1028466

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 25867005

VL - 16

SP - 344

EP - 349

JO - European Journal of Sport Science

JF - European Journal of Sport Science

SN - 1746-1391

IS - 3

ER -

ID: 135481731