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Instrumentalization of eating improves weight loss maintenance in obesity

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Standard

Instrumentalization of eating improves weight loss maintenance in obesity. / Christensen, Bodil Just; Iepsen, Eva Pers Winning; Lundgren, Julie Rehné; Holm, Lotte; Madsbad, Sten; Holst, Jens Juul; Torekov, Signe Sørensen.

I: Obesity Facts, Bind 10, Nr. 6, 2017, s. 633-647.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningfagfællebedømt

Harvard

Christensen, BJ, Iepsen, EPW, Lundgren, JR, Holm, L, Madsbad, S, Holst, JJ & Torekov, SS 2017, 'Instrumentalization of eating improves weight loss maintenance in obesity', Obesity Facts, bind 10, nr. 6, s. 633-647. https://doi.org/10.1159/000481138

APA

Christensen, B. J., Iepsen, E. P. W., Lundgren, J. R., Holm, L., Madsbad, S., Holst, J. J., & Torekov, S. S. (2017). Instrumentalization of eating improves weight loss maintenance in obesity. Obesity Facts, 10(6), 633-647. https://doi.org/10.1159/000481138

Vancouver

Christensen BJ, Iepsen EPW, Lundgren JR, Holm L, Madsbad S, Holst JJ o.a. Instrumentalization of eating improves weight loss maintenance in obesity. Obesity Facts. 2017;10(6):633-647. https://doi.org/10.1159/000481138

Author

Christensen, Bodil Just ; Iepsen, Eva Pers Winning ; Lundgren, Julie Rehné ; Holm, Lotte ; Madsbad, Sten ; Holst, Jens Juul ; Torekov, Signe Sørensen. / Instrumentalization of eating improves weight loss maintenance in obesity. I: Obesity Facts. 2017 ; Bind 10, Nr. 6. s. 633-647.

Bibtex

@article{49c7e45796df4f7e9dd477467fe8c97a,
title = "Instrumentalization of eating improves weight loss maintenance in obesity",
abstract = "Aim: The purpose of this study was to identify psychosocial determinants for maintaining weight loss. Methods: 42 obese individuals who achieved a 12{\%} weight loss before entering a 52-week weight maintenance program were interviewed qualitatively. Psychosocial factors related to weight loss maintenance were identified in two contrasting groups: weight reducers and weight regainers. Groups were defined by health-relevant weight maintenance (additional weight loss > 3{\%} at week 52, n = 9 versus weight gain > 3{\%}, at week 52, n = 20). Results: Weight reducers reported structured meal patterns (p = 0.008), no comfort eating (p = 0.016) and less psychosocial stress (p = 0.04) compared to weight regainers. The ability to instrumentalize eating behavior emerged as an important factor (p = 0.007). Nutritional knowledge, motivation or exercise level did not differ between groups (p > 0.05). Conclusions: Successful weight loss maintenance was associated with an interplay between behavioral, affective and contextual changes. ‘Instrumentalization of eating behavior' seems to be an important element in long-term weight maintenance.",
keywords = "Body weight maintenance, Interviews, Obesity, Psychosocial aspects, Qualitative research, Quantification",
author = "Christensen, {Bodil Just} and Iepsen, {Eva Pers Winning} and Lundgren, {Julie Rehn{\'e}} and Lotte Holm and Sten Madsbad and Holst, {Jens Juul} and Torekov, {Signe S{\o}rensen}",
year = "2017",
doi = "10.1159/000481138",
language = "English",
volume = "10",
pages = "633--647",
journal = "Obesity Facts",
issn = "1662-4025",
publisher = "S Karger AG",
number = "6",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Instrumentalization of eating improves weight loss maintenance in obesity

AU - Christensen, Bodil Just

AU - Iepsen, Eva Pers Winning

AU - Lundgren, Julie Rehné

AU - Holm, Lotte

AU - Madsbad, Sten

AU - Holst, Jens Juul

AU - Torekov, Signe Sørensen

PY - 2017

Y1 - 2017

N2 - Aim: The purpose of this study was to identify psychosocial determinants for maintaining weight loss. Methods: 42 obese individuals who achieved a 12% weight loss before entering a 52-week weight maintenance program were interviewed qualitatively. Psychosocial factors related to weight loss maintenance were identified in two contrasting groups: weight reducers and weight regainers. Groups were defined by health-relevant weight maintenance (additional weight loss > 3% at week 52, n = 9 versus weight gain > 3%, at week 52, n = 20). Results: Weight reducers reported structured meal patterns (p = 0.008), no comfort eating (p = 0.016) and less psychosocial stress (p = 0.04) compared to weight regainers. The ability to instrumentalize eating behavior emerged as an important factor (p = 0.007). Nutritional knowledge, motivation or exercise level did not differ between groups (p > 0.05). Conclusions: Successful weight loss maintenance was associated with an interplay between behavioral, affective and contextual changes. ‘Instrumentalization of eating behavior' seems to be an important element in long-term weight maintenance.

AB - Aim: The purpose of this study was to identify psychosocial determinants for maintaining weight loss. Methods: 42 obese individuals who achieved a 12% weight loss before entering a 52-week weight maintenance program were interviewed qualitatively. Psychosocial factors related to weight loss maintenance were identified in two contrasting groups: weight reducers and weight regainers. Groups were defined by health-relevant weight maintenance (additional weight loss > 3% at week 52, n = 9 versus weight gain > 3%, at week 52, n = 20). Results: Weight reducers reported structured meal patterns (p = 0.008), no comfort eating (p = 0.016) and less psychosocial stress (p = 0.04) compared to weight regainers. The ability to instrumentalize eating behavior emerged as an important factor (p = 0.007). Nutritional knowledge, motivation or exercise level did not differ between groups (p > 0.05). Conclusions: Successful weight loss maintenance was associated with an interplay between behavioral, affective and contextual changes. ‘Instrumentalization of eating behavior' seems to be an important element in long-term weight maintenance.

KW - Body weight maintenance

KW - Interviews

KW - Obesity

KW - Psychosocial aspects

KW - Qualitative research

KW - Quantification

U2 - 10.1159/000481138

DO - 10.1159/000481138

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 29207396

AN - SCOPUS:85037360898

VL - 10

SP - 633

EP - 647

JO - Obesity Facts

JF - Obesity Facts

SN - 1662-4025

IS - 6

ER -

ID: 187260602