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Insulin-like growth factor-I predicts sinusoidal obstruction syndrome following pediatric hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

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Sinusoidal obstruction syndrome (SOS) is a potentially fatal complication of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) initiated through damage of sinusoidal endothelium and inflammation. Insulin-like growth factor-l (IGF-l) maintains and repairs endothelium and intestinal mucosa. We hypothesized that low IGF-l levels may increase the risk of inflammatory complications, such as SOS, in HSCT-patients. We prospectively measured IGF-l concentrations in 121 pediatric patients before, during, and after allogeneic HSCT. Overall, IGF-l levels were significantly reduced compared with healthy sex- and age-matched children. IGF-I levels pre-HSCT and at day 0 were inversely associated with C-reactive protein levels, hyperbilirubinemia, and number of platelet transfusions within the first 21 days post-transplant. Low levels of IGF-I before conditioning and at day of transplant were associated with increased risk of SOS diagnosed by the modified Seattle criteria (pre-HSCT: OR = 1.7 (95% CI: 1.2–2.6, p = 0.01), and the pediatric EBMT criteria (pre-HSCT: 1.7 (1.2–2.5, p = 0.009) and day 0: 1.7 (1.3–2.5, p = 0.001)/SDS decrease in IGF-1). These data suggest that IGF-I is protective against cytotoxic damage and SOS, most likely through trophic effects on endothelial cells and anti-inflammatory properties, and may prove useful as a predictive biomarker of SOS.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftBone Marrow Transplantation
Vol/bind56
Udgave nummer5
Sider (fra-til)1021-1030
Antal sider10
ISSN0268-3369
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 2021

Bibliografisk note

Funding Information:
Acknowledgements Financial support was obtained from The Research Council at Rigshospitalet and The Childhood Cancer Foundation (#2017–1997).

Publisher Copyright:
© 2020, The Author(s), under exclusive licence to Springer Nature Limited.

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