Forskning ved Københavns Universitet - Københavns Universitet

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Knowledge and perceptions of dementia and Alzheimer's disease in four ethnic groups in Copenhagen, Denmark

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningfagfællebedømt

OBJECTIVE: Older people from ethnic minorities are underrepresented in dementia care. Some of the determinants of access to care are knowledge and perceptions of dementia, which may vary between ethnic groups in the population. The aims of this study were to compare knowledge and perceptions of dementia and Alzheimer's disease (AD) among four ethnic groups in Copenhagen, Denmark, and to assess the influence of education and acculturation.

METHODS: Quantitative survey data from 260 participants were analyzed: 100 native Danish, and 47 Polish, 51 Turkish, and 62 Pakistani immigrants. Knowledge and perceptions of dementia and AD were assessed with the Dementia Knowledge Questionnaire (DKQ) supplemented with two questions from the Alzheimer's Disease Awareness Test (ADAT). Knowledge and perceptions of dementia and AD in the four groups were compared, and the influence of education and acculturation was assessed.

RESULTS: Group differences were found on the DKQ total score as well as all sub-domains. Turkish and Pakistani people were most likely to hold normalizing and stigmatizing views of AD. Level of education and acculturation had limited influence on dementia knowledge, accounting for 22% of the variance at most and had only minor influence on perceptions of AD.

CONCLUSIONS: Lacking knowledge and certain perceptions of dementia and AD may hamper access to services in some ethnic minority groups. Ongoing efforts to raise awareness that dementia and AD are not part of normal aging, particularly among Turkish and Pakistani communities, should be a high priority for educational outreach.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftInternational Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry
Vol/bind31
Udgave nummer3
Sider (fra-til)222-30
Antal sider9
ISSN0885-6230
DOI
StatusUdgivet - mar. 2016

ID: 164137065