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Measles vaccination in the presence or absence of maternal measles antibody: impact on child survival

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningfagfællebedømt

Standard

Measles vaccination in the presence or absence of maternal measles antibody : impact on child survival. / Aaby, Peter; Martins, Cesário L; Garly, May-Lill; Andersen, Andreas; Fisker, Ane B; Claesson, Mogens H; Ravn, Henrik; Rodrigues, Amabelia; Whittle, Hilton C; Benn, Christine S.

I: Clinical infectious diseases : an official publication of the Infectious Diseases Society of America, Bind 59, Nr. 4, 15.08.2014, s. 484-92.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningfagfællebedømt

Harvard

Aaby, P, Martins, CL, Garly, M-L, Andersen, A, Fisker, AB, Claesson, MH, Ravn, H, Rodrigues, A, Whittle, HC & Benn, CS 2014, 'Measles vaccination in the presence or absence of maternal measles antibody: impact on child survival', Clinical infectious diseases : an official publication of the Infectious Diseases Society of America, bind 59, nr. 4, s. 484-92. https://doi.org/10.1093/cid/ciu354

APA

Aaby, P., Martins, C. L., Garly, M-L., Andersen, A., Fisker, A. B., Claesson, M. H., Ravn, H., Rodrigues, A., Whittle, H. C., & Benn, C. S. (2014). Measles vaccination in the presence or absence of maternal measles antibody: impact on child survival. Clinical infectious diseases : an official publication of the Infectious Diseases Society of America, 59(4), 484-92. https://doi.org/10.1093/cid/ciu354

Vancouver

Aaby P, Martins CL, Garly M-L, Andersen A, Fisker AB, Claesson MH o.a. Measles vaccination in the presence or absence of maternal measles antibody: impact on child survival. Clinical infectious diseases : an official publication of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. 2014 aug 15;59(4):484-92. https://doi.org/10.1093/cid/ciu354

Author

Aaby, Peter ; Martins, Cesário L ; Garly, May-Lill ; Andersen, Andreas ; Fisker, Ane B ; Claesson, Mogens H ; Ravn, Henrik ; Rodrigues, Amabelia ; Whittle, Hilton C ; Benn, Christine S. / Measles vaccination in the presence or absence of maternal measles antibody : impact on child survival. I: Clinical infectious diseases : an official publication of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. 2014 ; Bind 59, Nr. 4. s. 484-92.

Bibtex

@article{3ca518fc38c941f380e88d598c974816,
title = "Measles vaccination in the presence or absence of maternal measles antibody: impact on child survival",
abstract = "BACKGROUND: Measles vaccine (MV) has a greater effect on child survival when administered in early infancy, when maternal antibody may still be present.METHODS: To test whether MV has a greater effect on overall survival if given in the presence of maternal measles antibody, we reanalyzed data from 2 previously published randomized trials of a 2-dose schedule with MV given at 4-6 months and at 9 months of age. In both trials antibody levels had been measured before early measles vaccination.RESULTS: In trial I (1993-1995), the mortality rate was 0.0 per 1000 person-years among children vaccinated with MV in the presence of maternal antibody and 32.3 per 1000 person-years without maternal antibody (mortality rate ratio [MRR], 0.0; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0-.52). In trial II (2003-2007), the mortality rate was 4.2 per 1000 person-years among children vaccinated in presence of maternal measles antibody and 14.5 per 1000 person-years without measles antibody (MRR, 0.29; 95% CI, .09-.91). Possible confounding factors did not explain the difference. In a combined analysis, children who had measles antibody detected when they received their first dose of MV at 4-6 months of age had lower mortality than children with no maternal antibody, the MRR being 0.22 (95% CI, .07-.64) between 4-6 months and 5 years.CONCLUSIONS: Child mortality in low-income countries may be reduced by vaccinating against measles in the presence of maternal antibody, using a 2-dose schedule with the first dose at 4-6 months (earlier than currently recommended) and a booster dose at 9-12 months of age.CLINICAL TRIALS REGISTRATION: NCT00168558.",
keywords = "Antibodies, Viral, Child, Preschool, Developing Countries, Female, Humans, Immunity, Maternally-Acquired, Infant, Male, Measles, Measles Vaccine, Survival Analysis, Vaccination",
author = "Peter Aaby and Martins, {Ces{\'a}rio L} and May-Lill Garly and Andreas Andersen and Fisker, {Ane B} and Claesson, {Mogens H} and Henrik Ravn and Amabelia Rodrigues and Whittle, {Hilton C} and Benn, {Christine S}",
note = "{\textcopyright} The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America.",
year = "2014",
month = aug,
day = "15",
doi = "10.1093/cid/ciu354",
language = "English",
volume = "59",
pages = "484--92",
journal = "Clinical Infectious Diseases",
issn = "1058-4838",
publisher = "Oxford University Press",
number = "4",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Measles vaccination in the presence or absence of maternal measles antibody

T2 - impact on child survival

AU - Aaby, Peter

AU - Martins, Cesário L

AU - Garly, May-Lill

AU - Andersen, Andreas

AU - Fisker, Ane B

AU - Claesson, Mogens H

AU - Ravn, Henrik

AU - Rodrigues, Amabelia

AU - Whittle, Hilton C

AU - Benn, Christine S

N1 - © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America.

PY - 2014/8/15

Y1 - 2014/8/15

N2 - BACKGROUND: Measles vaccine (MV) has a greater effect on child survival when administered in early infancy, when maternal antibody may still be present.METHODS: To test whether MV has a greater effect on overall survival if given in the presence of maternal measles antibody, we reanalyzed data from 2 previously published randomized trials of a 2-dose schedule with MV given at 4-6 months and at 9 months of age. In both trials antibody levels had been measured before early measles vaccination.RESULTS: In trial I (1993-1995), the mortality rate was 0.0 per 1000 person-years among children vaccinated with MV in the presence of maternal antibody and 32.3 per 1000 person-years without maternal antibody (mortality rate ratio [MRR], 0.0; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0-.52). In trial II (2003-2007), the mortality rate was 4.2 per 1000 person-years among children vaccinated in presence of maternal measles antibody and 14.5 per 1000 person-years without measles antibody (MRR, 0.29; 95% CI, .09-.91). Possible confounding factors did not explain the difference. In a combined analysis, children who had measles antibody detected when they received their first dose of MV at 4-6 months of age had lower mortality than children with no maternal antibody, the MRR being 0.22 (95% CI, .07-.64) between 4-6 months and 5 years.CONCLUSIONS: Child mortality in low-income countries may be reduced by vaccinating against measles in the presence of maternal antibody, using a 2-dose schedule with the first dose at 4-6 months (earlier than currently recommended) and a booster dose at 9-12 months of age.CLINICAL TRIALS REGISTRATION: NCT00168558.

AB - BACKGROUND: Measles vaccine (MV) has a greater effect on child survival when administered in early infancy, when maternal antibody may still be present.METHODS: To test whether MV has a greater effect on overall survival if given in the presence of maternal measles antibody, we reanalyzed data from 2 previously published randomized trials of a 2-dose schedule with MV given at 4-6 months and at 9 months of age. In both trials antibody levels had been measured before early measles vaccination.RESULTS: In trial I (1993-1995), the mortality rate was 0.0 per 1000 person-years among children vaccinated with MV in the presence of maternal antibody and 32.3 per 1000 person-years without maternal antibody (mortality rate ratio [MRR], 0.0; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0-.52). In trial II (2003-2007), the mortality rate was 4.2 per 1000 person-years among children vaccinated in presence of maternal measles antibody and 14.5 per 1000 person-years without measles antibody (MRR, 0.29; 95% CI, .09-.91). Possible confounding factors did not explain the difference. In a combined analysis, children who had measles antibody detected when they received their first dose of MV at 4-6 months of age had lower mortality than children with no maternal antibody, the MRR being 0.22 (95% CI, .07-.64) between 4-6 months and 5 years.CONCLUSIONS: Child mortality in low-income countries may be reduced by vaccinating against measles in the presence of maternal antibody, using a 2-dose schedule with the first dose at 4-6 months (earlier than currently recommended) and a booster dose at 9-12 months of age.CLINICAL TRIALS REGISTRATION: NCT00168558.

KW - Antibodies, Viral

KW - Child, Preschool

KW - Developing Countries

KW - Female

KW - Humans

KW - Immunity, Maternally-Acquired

KW - Infant

KW - Male

KW - Measles

KW - Measles Vaccine

KW - Survival Analysis

KW - Vaccination

U2 - 10.1093/cid/ciu354

DO - 10.1093/cid/ciu354

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 24829213

VL - 59

SP - 484

EP - 492

JO - Clinical Infectious Diseases

JF - Clinical Infectious Diseases

SN - 1058-4838

IS - 4

ER -

ID: 136852447