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Morphological Convergence in Hippidion and Equus (Amerhippus) South American Equids Elucidated by Ancient DNA Analysis

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Unusual equids named hippidions inhabited South America for more than 2 MY (million years). Like many other animals they succumbed to the worldwide climatic change that occurred 10 KY (thousand years) ago and completely disappeared during the great late Pleistocene megafaunal extinction. According to fossil records and numerous dental, cranial, and postcranial characters, Hippidion and Equus lineages are known to have diverged prior to 10 MY. Some equid bones from Rio Verde and Ultima Esperanza (Patagonia, Chile) dating back to the late Pleistocene period (8-13 KY) have been identified as Hippidion saldiasi, while a few teeth have been assigned to Equus. Six samples of those remains have been obtained from the Zoological Museum of Amsterdam for ancient DNA analysis to try to place Hippidion in the evolutive tree of Perissodactyla. Two samples of Hippidion and one sample of Equus yielded 241-394 bp of the mtDNA control region and 172-296 bp of the cytochrome b gene. Unexpectedly, all the sequences clustered deep inside the Equus genus, casting doubt on the initial identification of the bones. For paleontologists, one of the striking and classical diagnostic characters of Hippidion is their extremely short and massive metapodials, a probable locomotory adaptation to the Andine steep slopes. However, our DNA analysis reveals that a very Hippidion-like metapod might also have been possessed by another South American equid, i.e., Equus (Amerhippus), an interpretation supported by complementary anatomical observations. This adaptive convergence between members of the two South American equid genera may lead paleontologists to limb bone misidentification.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftJournal of Molecular Evolution
Vol/bind57
Udgave nummerSUPPL. 1
Sider (fra-til)S29-S40
ISSN0022-2844
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 2003
Eksternt udgivetJa

ID: 226118173