Forskning ved Københavns Universitet - Københavns Universitet

Forside

Narrative coaching

Publikation: Bidrag til bog/antologi/rapportBidrag til bog/antologiForskningfagfællebedømt

Standard

Narrative coaching. / Drake, David; Stelter, Reinhard.

Mastery in Coaching : A complete psychological toolkit for advanced coaching . red. / Jonathan Passmore. London : Kogan Page, 2014. s. 65-96.

Publikation: Bidrag til bog/antologi/rapportBidrag til bog/antologiForskningfagfællebedømt

Harvard

Drake, D & Stelter, R 2014, Narrative coaching. i J Passmore (red.), Mastery in Coaching : A complete psychological toolkit for advanced coaching . Kogan Page, London, s. 65-96.

APA

Drake, D., & Stelter, R. (2014). Narrative coaching. I J. Passmore (red.), Mastery in Coaching : A complete psychological toolkit for advanced coaching (s. 65-96). London: Kogan Page.

Vancouver

Drake D, Stelter R. Narrative coaching. I Passmore J, red., Mastery in Coaching : A complete psychological toolkit for advanced coaching . London: Kogan Page. 2014. s. 65-96

Author

Drake, David ; Stelter, Reinhard. / Narrative coaching. Mastery in Coaching : A complete psychological toolkit for advanced coaching . red. / Jonathan Passmore. London : Kogan Page, 2014. s. 65-96

Bibtex

@inbook{1b136816edf64956b0dd6a666845322d,
title = "Narrative coaching",
abstract = "From the introduction:While a narrative frame is relatively new in the fi elds of psychotherapy andcoaching, stories have been an essential constituent of cultures and communities since the dawn of time and are fundamental to the way we make sense and meaning. We use stories to structure our experience as ‘events’ in space and seek to join them together in a sensible causal timeline in keeping with the fact that our brains use space and time as primary coordinates (seeSchank, 1990 ). In many ways, our identity becomes a refl ection of theembodied schemas we adopt over time and the stories we keep individuallyand collectively telling ourselves that reinforce them. As such, they are atthe core of what it means to be human – as refl ected in our biology, ontology,epistemology and cosmology – and a natural medium for use in coaching.Narrative coaches are, therefore, keenly interested in what Foucault (1965 )called people’s ‘theory of events’, particularly as they wrestle with existentialissues and choices in their life and work.",
author = "David Drake and Reinhard Stelter",
note = "CURIS 2014 NEXS 259",
year = "2014",
month = "9",
day = "3",
language = "English",
isbn = "9780749471798",
pages = "65--96",
editor = "Jonathan Passmore",
booktitle = "Mastery in Coaching",
publisher = "Kogan Page",

}

RIS

TY - CHAP

T1 - Narrative coaching

AU - Drake, David

AU - Stelter, Reinhard

N1 - CURIS 2014 NEXS 259

PY - 2014/9/3

Y1 - 2014/9/3

N2 - From the introduction:While a narrative frame is relatively new in the fi elds of psychotherapy andcoaching, stories have been an essential constituent of cultures and communities since the dawn of time and are fundamental to the way we make sense and meaning. We use stories to structure our experience as ‘events’ in space and seek to join them together in a sensible causal timeline in keeping with the fact that our brains use space and time as primary coordinates (seeSchank, 1990 ). In many ways, our identity becomes a refl ection of theembodied schemas we adopt over time and the stories we keep individuallyand collectively telling ourselves that reinforce them. As such, they are atthe core of what it means to be human – as refl ected in our biology, ontology,epistemology and cosmology – and a natural medium for use in coaching.Narrative coaches are, therefore, keenly interested in what Foucault (1965 )called people’s ‘theory of events’, particularly as they wrestle with existentialissues and choices in their life and work.

AB - From the introduction:While a narrative frame is relatively new in the fi elds of psychotherapy andcoaching, stories have been an essential constituent of cultures and communities since the dawn of time and are fundamental to the way we make sense and meaning. We use stories to structure our experience as ‘events’ in space and seek to join them together in a sensible causal timeline in keeping with the fact that our brains use space and time as primary coordinates (seeSchank, 1990 ). In many ways, our identity becomes a refl ection of theembodied schemas we adopt over time and the stories we keep individuallyand collectively telling ourselves that reinforce them. As such, they are atthe core of what it means to be human – as refl ected in our biology, ontology,epistemology and cosmology – and a natural medium for use in coaching.Narrative coaches are, therefore, keenly interested in what Foucault (1965 )called people’s ‘theory of events’, particularly as they wrestle with existentialissues and choices in their life and work.

M3 - Book chapter

SN - 9780749471798

SP - 65

EP - 96

BT - Mastery in Coaching

A2 - Passmore, Jonathan

PB - Kogan Page

CY - London

ER -

ID: 123243934