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No evidence for generalized increased postoperative responsiveness to pain: a combined behavioral and serial functional magnetic resonance imaging study

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No evidence for generalized increased postoperative responsiveness to pain: a combined behavioral and serial functional magnetic resonance imaging study. / Kupers, Ron; Schneider, Fabien C G; Christensen, Rune; Naert, Arne; Husted, Henrik; Paulson, Olaf B; Kehlet, Henrik.

I: Anesthesia and Analgesia, Bind 109, Nr. 2, 2009, s. 600-6.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningfagfællebedømt

Harvard

Kupers, R, Schneider, FCG, Christensen, R, Naert, A, Husted, H, Paulson, OB & Kehlet, H 2009, 'No evidence for generalized increased postoperative responsiveness to pain: a combined behavioral and serial functional magnetic resonance imaging study', Anesthesia and Analgesia, bind 109, nr. 2, s. 600-6. https://doi.org/10.1213/ane.0b013e3181ac1866

APA

Kupers, R., Schneider, F. C. G., Christensen, R., Naert, A., Husted, H., Paulson, O. B., & Kehlet, H. (2009). No evidence for generalized increased postoperative responsiveness to pain: a combined behavioral and serial functional magnetic resonance imaging study. Anesthesia and Analgesia, 109(2), 600-6. https://doi.org/10.1213/ane.0b013e3181ac1866

Vancouver

Kupers R, Schneider FCG, Christensen R, Naert A, Husted H, Paulson OB o.a. No evidence for generalized increased postoperative responsiveness to pain: a combined behavioral and serial functional magnetic resonance imaging study. Anesthesia and Analgesia. 2009;109(2):600-6. https://doi.org/10.1213/ane.0b013e3181ac1866

Author

Kupers, Ron ; Schneider, Fabien C G ; Christensen, Rune ; Naert, Arne ; Husted, Henrik ; Paulson, Olaf B ; Kehlet, Henrik. / No evidence for generalized increased postoperative responsiveness to pain: a combined behavioral and serial functional magnetic resonance imaging study. I: Anesthesia and Analgesia. 2009 ; Bind 109, Nr. 2. s. 600-6.

Bibtex

@article{84b0dea0aac411df928f000ea68e967b,
title = "No evidence for generalized increased postoperative responsiveness to pain: a combined behavioral and serial functional magnetic resonance imaging study",
abstract = "BACKGROUND: Although it is generally accepted that increased pain responsiveness and central sensitization develop after major tissue injury, this claim has not been tested using brain imaging methods in a clinical pain setting. We tested this hypothesis using a postoperative pain model, in conjunction with serial functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). METHODS: We studied brain and subjective pain responses to innocuous and noxious heat in seven patients before and after total knee arthroplasty. Noxious and innocuous thermal stimuli were applied to the upper leg, proximal to the surgical area and to the lower forearm, a site remote from the surgical area. A group of eight age- and sex-matched control subjects underwent the same two-test procedure except that they were not submitted to an orthopedic surgical intervention. RESULTS: Subjective pain and brain responses to innocuous and noxious stimulation were not increased postoperatively. Actually, responses in primary and secondary somatosensory cortex for stimulation of the operated leg were significantly smaller after surgery. Brain responses in the control group did not differ significantly across the two sessions. CONCLUSION: These data argue against the development of an overall increased pain responsiveness after a major surgical trauma. The data are in contrast with results from animal studies and from brain imaging studies using surrogate models of clinical pain, which have shown increased central responsiveness in the area around the insult, thereby calling into question the clinical implications of acute postinjury sensitization.",
author = "Ron Kupers and Schneider, {Fabien C G} and Rune Christensen and Arne Naert and Henrik Husted and Paulson, {Olaf B} and Henrik Kehlet",
note = "Keywords: Aged; Anxiety; Arthroplasty, Replacement, Knee; Behavior; Brain; Female; Hot Temperature; Humans; Image Processing, Computer-Assisted; Magnetic Resonance Imaging; Male; Middle Aged; Oxygen; Pain; Pain Measurement; Postoperative Period; Quality of Life; Somatosensory Cortex",
year = "2009",
doi = "10.1213/ane.0b013e3181ac1866",
language = "English",
volume = "109",
pages = "600--6",
journal = "Anesthesia and Analgesia",
issn = "0003-2999",
publisher = "Lippincott Williams & Wilkins",
number = "2",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - No evidence for generalized increased postoperative responsiveness to pain: a combined behavioral and serial functional magnetic resonance imaging study

AU - Kupers, Ron

AU - Schneider, Fabien C G

AU - Christensen, Rune

AU - Naert, Arne

AU - Husted, Henrik

AU - Paulson, Olaf B

AU - Kehlet, Henrik

N1 - Keywords: Aged; Anxiety; Arthroplasty, Replacement, Knee; Behavior; Brain; Female; Hot Temperature; Humans; Image Processing, Computer-Assisted; Magnetic Resonance Imaging; Male; Middle Aged; Oxygen; Pain; Pain Measurement; Postoperative Period; Quality of Life; Somatosensory Cortex

PY - 2009

Y1 - 2009

N2 - BACKGROUND: Although it is generally accepted that increased pain responsiveness and central sensitization develop after major tissue injury, this claim has not been tested using brain imaging methods in a clinical pain setting. We tested this hypothesis using a postoperative pain model, in conjunction with serial functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). METHODS: We studied brain and subjective pain responses to innocuous and noxious heat in seven patients before and after total knee arthroplasty. Noxious and innocuous thermal stimuli were applied to the upper leg, proximal to the surgical area and to the lower forearm, a site remote from the surgical area. A group of eight age- and sex-matched control subjects underwent the same two-test procedure except that they were not submitted to an orthopedic surgical intervention. RESULTS: Subjective pain and brain responses to innocuous and noxious stimulation were not increased postoperatively. Actually, responses in primary and secondary somatosensory cortex for stimulation of the operated leg were significantly smaller after surgery. Brain responses in the control group did not differ significantly across the two sessions. CONCLUSION: These data argue against the development of an overall increased pain responsiveness after a major surgical trauma. The data are in contrast with results from animal studies and from brain imaging studies using surrogate models of clinical pain, which have shown increased central responsiveness in the area around the insult, thereby calling into question the clinical implications of acute postinjury sensitization.

AB - BACKGROUND: Although it is generally accepted that increased pain responsiveness and central sensitization develop after major tissue injury, this claim has not been tested using brain imaging methods in a clinical pain setting. We tested this hypothesis using a postoperative pain model, in conjunction with serial functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). METHODS: We studied brain and subjective pain responses to innocuous and noxious heat in seven patients before and after total knee arthroplasty. Noxious and innocuous thermal stimuli were applied to the upper leg, proximal to the surgical area and to the lower forearm, a site remote from the surgical area. A group of eight age- and sex-matched control subjects underwent the same two-test procedure except that they were not submitted to an orthopedic surgical intervention. RESULTS: Subjective pain and brain responses to innocuous and noxious stimulation were not increased postoperatively. Actually, responses in primary and secondary somatosensory cortex for stimulation of the operated leg were significantly smaller after surgery. Brain responses in the control group did not differ significantly across the two sessions. CONCLUSION: These data argue against the development of an overall increased pain responsiveness after a major surgical trauma. The data are in contrast with results from animal studies and from brain imaging studies using surrogate models of clinical pain, which have shown increased central responsiveness in the area around the insult, thereby calling into question the clinical implications of acute postinjury sensitization.

U2 - 10.1213/ane.0b013e3181ac1866

DO - 10.1213/ane.0b013e3181ac1866

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 19608837

VL - 109

SP - 600

EP - 606

JO - Anesthesia and Analgesia

JF - Anesthesia and Analgesia

SN - 0003-2999

IS - 2

ER -

ID: 21457129