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“‘Organics’ are good, but we don’t know exactly what the term means!”: Trust and knowledge in organic consumption

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningfagfællebedømt

Standard

“‘Organics’ are good, but we don’t know exactly what the term means!” : Trust and knowledge in organic consumption. / Thorsøe, Martin Hvarregaard; Christensen, Tove; Povlsen, Karen Klitgaard.

I: Food, Culture and Society, Bind 19, Nr. 4, 2016, s. 681-704 .

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningfagfællebedømt

Harvard

Thorsøe, MH, Christensen, T & Povlsen, KK 2016, '“‘Organics’ are good, but we don’t know exactly what the term means!”: Trust and knowledge in organic consumption', Food, Culture and Society, bind 19, nr. 4, s. 681-704 . https://doi.org/10.1080/15528014.2016.1243767

APA

Thorsøe, M. H., Christensen, T., & Povlsen, K. K. (2016). “‘Organics’ are good, but we don’t know exactly what the term means!”: Trust and knowledge in organic consumption. Food, Culture and Society, 19(4), 681-704 . https://doi.org/10.1080/15528014.2016.1243767

Vancouver

Thorsøe MH, Christensen T, Povlsen KK. “‘Organics’ are good, but we don’t know exactly what the term means!”: Trust and knowledge in organic consumption. Food, Culture and Society. 2016;19(4):681-704 . https://doi.org/10.1080/15528014.2016.1243767

Author

Thorsøe, Martin Hvarregaard ; Christensen, Tove ; Povlsen, Karen Klitgaard. / “‘Organics’ are good, but we don’t know exactly what the term means!” : Trust and knowledge in organic consumption. I: Food, Culture and Society. 2016 ; Bind 19, Nr. 4. s. 681-704 .

Bibtex

@article{472e4c16aa1d457ebc092bf5fa0b9be1,
title = "“{\textquoteleft}Organics{\textquoteright} are good, but we don{\textquoteright}t know exactly what the term means!”: Trust and knowledge in organic consumption",
abstract = "This article explores consumer trust in organics and investigates the relationship between credibility, trust, and knowledge in a mixed-method study incorporating a survey, a focus group, and individual interviews. Danish consumers show a high level of systemic trust in the organic label, which can be trumped by personal trust. Consumers wanting to know more about organics are mainly those who already know a lot, while others show a deliberate lack of knowledge. Furthermore, it is argued that knowledge does not lead to trust—trust replaces knowledge, and consumers largely seek confirmation of their views when they have already made up their minds about organics.",
author = "Thors{\o}e, {Martin Hvarregaard} and Tove Christensen and Povlsen, {Karen Klitgaard}",
year = "2016",
doi = "10.1080/15528014.2016.1243767",
language = "English",
volume = "19",
pages = "681--704 ",
journal = "Food, Culture and Society",
issn = "1528-9796",
number = "4",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - “‘Organics’ are good, but we don’t know exactly what the term means!”

T2 - Trust and knowledge in organic consumption

AU - Thorsøe, Martin Hvarregaard

AU - Christensen, Tove

AU - Povlsen, Karen Klitgaard

PY - 2016

Y1 - 2016

N2 - This article explores consumer trust in organics and investigates the relationship between credibility, trust, and knowledge in a mixed-method study incorporating a survey, a focus group, and individual interviews. Danish consumers show a high level of systemic trust in the organic label, which can be trumped by personal trust. Consumers wanting to know more about organics are mainly those who already know a lot, while others show a deliberate lack of knowledge. Furthermore, it is argued that knowledge does not lead to trust—trust replaces knowledge, and consumers largely seek confirmation of their views when they have already made up their minds about organics.

AB - This article explores consumer trust in organics and investigates the relationship between credibility, trust, and knowledge in a mixed-method study incorporating a survey, a focus group, and individual interviews. Danish consumers show a high level of systemic trust in the organic label, which can be trumped by personal trust. Consumers wanting to know more about organics are mainly those who already know a lot, while others show a deliberate lack of knowledge. Furthermore, it is argued that knowledge does not lead to trust—trust replaces knowledge, and consumers largely seek confirmation of their views when they have already made up their minds about organics.

U2 - 10.1080/15528014.2016.1243767

DO - 10.1080/15528014.2016.1243767

M3 - Journal article

VL - 19

SP - 681

EP - 704

JO - Food, Culture and Society

JF - Food, Culture and Society

SN - 1528-9796

IS - 4

ER -

ID: 168886885