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Postoperative increase in grey matter volume in visual cortex after unilateral cataract surgery

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Standard

Postoperative increase in grey matter volume in visual cortex after unilateral cataract surgery. / Lou, Astrid R; Madsen, Kristoffer H; Julian, Hanne O; Toft, Peter B; Kjær, Troels Wesenberg; Paulson, Olaf B; Prause, Jan Ulrik; Siebner, Hartwig R.

I: Acta Ophthalmologica, Bind 91, Nr. 1, 2013, s. 58-65.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningfagfællebedømt

Harvard

Lou, AR, Madsen, KH, Julian, HO, Toft, PB, Kjær, TW, Paulson, OB, Prause, JU & Siebner, HR 2013, 'Postoperative increase in grey matter volume in visual cortex after unilateral cataract surgery', Acta Ophthalmologica, bind 91, nr. 1, s. 58-65. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1755-3768.2011.02304.x

APA

Lou, A. R., Madsen, K. H., Julian, H. O., Toft, P. B., Kjær, T. W., Paulson, O. B., ... Siebner, H. R. (2013). Postoperative increase in grey matter volume in visual cortex after unilateral cataract surgery. Acta Ophthalmologica, 91(1), 58-65. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1755-3768.2011.02304.x

Vancouver

Lou AR, Madsen KH, Julian HO, Toft PB, Kjær TW, Paulson OB o.a. Postoperative increase in grey matter volume in visual cortex after unilateral cataract surgery. Acta Ophthalmologica. 2013;91(1):58-65. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1755-3768.2011.02304.x

Author

Lou, Astrid R ; Madsen, Kristoffer H ; Julian, Hanne O ; Toft, Peter B ; Kjær, Troels Wesenberg ; Paulson, Olaf B ; Prause, Jan Ulrik ; Siebner, Hartwig R. / Postoperative increase in grey matter volume in visual cortex after unilateral cataract surgery. I: Acta Ophthalmologica. 2013 ; Bind 91, Nr. 1. s. 58-65.

Bibtex

@article{7b6158047ce34bb09ce5cd8ec3d5ef75,
title = "Postoperative increase in grey matter volume in visual cortex after unilateral cataract surgery",
abstract = "Purpose: The developing visual cortex has a strong potential to undergo plastic changes. Little is known about the potential of the ageing visual cortex to express plasticity. A pertinent question is whether therapeutic interventions can trigger plastic changes in the ageing visual cortex by restoring vision. Methods: Twelve patients aged 50-85 years underwent structural high-resolution T1-weighted MRI of the whole brain 2 days and 6 weeks after unilateral cataract surgery. Voxel-based morphometry (VBM) based on T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was employed to test whether cataract surgery induces a regional increase in grey matter in areas V1 and V2 of the visual cortex. Results: In all patients, cataract surgery immediately improved visual acuity, contrast sensitivity and mean sensitivity in the visual field of the operated eye. The improvement in vision was stable throughout the 6 weeks after operation. VBM revealed a regional expansion of grey matter volume in area V2 contralateral to the operated eye during the 6-week period after surgery. Individual increases in grey matter were predicted by the symmetry in visual acuity between the operated eye and nonoperated eye. The more symmetrical visual acuity became after unilateral cataract surgery, the more pronounced was the grey matter increase in visual cortex. Conclusion: The data suggest that cataract surgery triggered a use-dependent structural plasticity in V2 presumably through improved binocular integration of visual input from both eyes. We conclude that activity-dependent cortical plasticity is preserved in the ageing visual cortex and may be triggered by restoring impaired vision.",
author = "Lou, {Astrid R} and Madsen, {Kristoffer H} and Julian, {Hanne O} and Toft, {Peter B} and Kj{\ae}r, {Troels Wesenberg} and Paulson, {Olaf B} and Prause, {Jan Ulrik} and Siebner, {Hartwig R}",
note = "{\circledC} 2011 The Authors. Acta Ophthalmologica {\circledC} 2011 Acta Ophthalmologica Scandinavica Foundation.",
year = "2013",
doi = "10.1111/j.1755-3768.2011.02304.x",
language = "English",
volume = "91",
pages = "58--65",
journal = "Acta Ophthalmologica",
issn = "1755-375X",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "1",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Postoperative increase in grey matter volume in visual cortex after unilateral cataract surgery

AU - Lou, Astrid R

AU - Madsen, Kristoffer H

AU - Julian, Hanne O

AU - Toft, Peter B

AU - Kjær, Troels Wesenberg

AU - Paulson, Olaf B

AU - Prause, Jan Ulrik

AU - Siebner, Hartwig R

N1 - © 2011 The Authors. Acta Ophthalmologica © 2011 Acta Ophthalmologica Scandinavica Foundation.

PY - 2013

Y1 - 2013

N2 - Purpose: The developing visual cortex has a strong potential to undergo plastic changes. Little is known about the potential of the ageing visual cortex to express plasticity. A pertinent question is whether therapeutic interventions can trigger plastic changes in the ageing visual cortex by restoring vision. Methods: Twelve patients aged 50-85 years underwent structural high-resolution T1-weighted MRI of the whole brain 2 days and 6 weeks after unilateral cataract surgery. Voxel-based morphometry (VBM) based on T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was employed to test whether cataract surgery induces a regional increase in grey matter in areas V1 and V2 of the visual cortex. Results: In all patients, cataract surgery immediately improved visual acuity, contrast sensitivity and mean sensitivity in the visual field of the operated eye. The improvement in vision was stable throughout the 6 weeks after operation. VBM revealed a regional expansion of grey matter volume in area V2 contralateral to the operated eye during the 6-week period after surgery. Individual increases in grey matter were predicted by the symmetry in visual acuity between the operated eye and nonoperated eye. The more symmetrical visual acuity became after unilateral cataract surgery, the more pronounced was the grey matter increase in visual cortex. Conclusion: The data suggest that cataract surgery triggered a use-dependent structural plasticity in V2 presumably through improved binocular integration of visual input from both eyes. We conclude that activity-dependent cortical plasticity is preserved in the ageing visual cortex and may be triggered by restoring impaired vision.

AB - Purpose: The developing visual cortex has a strong potential to undergo plastic changes. Little is known about the potential of the ageing visual cortex to express plasticity. A pertinent question is whether therapeutic interventions can trigger plastic changes in the ageing visual cortex by restoring vision. Methods: Twelve patients aged 50-85 years underwent structural high-resolution T1-weighted MRI of the whole brain 2 days and 6 weeks after unilateral cataract surgery. Voxel-based morphometry (VBM) based on T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was employed to test whether cataract surgery induces a regional increase in grey matter in areas V1 and V2 of the visual cortex. Results: In all patients, cataract surgery immediately improved visual acuity, contrast sensitivity and mean sensitivity in the visual field of the operated eye. The improvement in vision was stable throughout the 6 weeks after operation. VBM revealed a regional expansion of grey matter volume in area V2 contralateral to the operated eye during the 6-week period after surgery. Individual increases in grey matter were predicted by the symmetry in visual acuity between the operated eye and nonoperated eye. The more symmetrical visual acuity became after unilateral cataract surgery, the more pronounced was the grey matter increase in visual cortex. Conclusion: The data suggest that cataract surgery triggered a use-dependent structural plasticity in V2 presumably through improved binocular integration of visual input from both eyes. We conclude that activity-dependent cortical plasticity is preserved in the ageing visual cortex and may be triggered by restoring impaired vision.

U2 - 10.1111/j.1755-3768.2011.02304.x

DO - 10.1111/j.1755-3768.2011.02304.x

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 22103594

VL - 91

SP - 58

EP - 65

JO - Acta Ophthalmologica

JF - Acta Ophthalmologica

SN - 1755-375X

IS - 1

ER -

ID: 40199939