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S-100b and neuron-specific enolase in patients with fulminant hepatic failure

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningfagfællebedømt

Standard

S-100b and neuron-specific enolase in patients with fulminant hepatic failure. / Strauss, Gitte Irene; Christiansen, Michael; Møller, Kirsten; Clemmesen, Jens Otto; Larsen, Finn Stolze; Knudsen, Karen Birgitte Moos.

I: Liver Transplantation, Bind 7, Nr. 11, 31.12.2001, s. 964-970.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningfagfællebedømt

Harvard

Strauss, GI, Christiansen, M, Møller, K, Clemmesen, JO, Larsen, FS & Knudsen, KBM 2001, 'S-100b and neuron-specific enolase in patients with fulminant hepatic failure', Liver Transplantation, bind 7, nr. 11, s. 964-970.

APA

Strauss, G. I., Christiansen, M., Møller, K., Clemmesen, J. O., Larsen, F. S., & Knudsen, K. B. M. (2001). S-100b and neuron-specific enolase in patients with fulminant hepatic failure. Liver Transplantation, 7(11), 964-970.

Vancouver

Strauss GI, Christiansen M, Møller K, Clemmesen JO, Larsen FS, Knudsen KBM. S-100b and neuron-specific enolase in patients with fulminant hepatic failure. Liver Transplantation. 2001 dec 31;7(11):964-970.

Author

Strauss, Gitte Irene ; Christiansen, Michael ; Møller, Kirsten ; Clemmesen, Jens Otto ; Larsen, Finn Stolze ; Knudsen, Karen Birgitte Moos. / S-100b and neuron-specific enolase in patients with fulminant hepatic failure. I: Liver Transplantation. 2001 ; Bind 7, Nr. 11. s. 964-970.

Bibtex

@article{583301bdd2e94dc4ab1e905522413f61,
title = "S-100b and neuron-specific enolase in patients with fulminant hepatic failure",
abstract = "Patients with fulminant hepatic failure (FHF) frequently develop cerebral edema and intracranial hypertension. The aim of this study was to evaluate circulating S-100b and neuron-specific enolase (NSE) levels as markers of neurological outcome in patients with FHF. In a subgroup of patients, the cerebral flux of S-100b and NSE was measured. We included 35 patients with FHF, 6 patients with acute on chronic liver disease (AOCLD), 13 patients with cirrhosis of the liver without hepatic encephalopathy, and 8 healthy subjects. Blood samples were obtained from catheters placed in the radial artery and internal jugular bulb. The net cerebral flux of S-100b and NSE was measured, and the effect of short-term hyperventilation, as well as the effect of high-volume plasmapheresis, on circulating levels of these two biomarkers was determined. Blood levels of S-100b were greater in patients with FHF and AOCLD than patients with cirrhosis and healthy subjects (median, 0.39 microg/L; range, 0.02 to 10.31 microg/L; and 1.11 microg/L; range, 0.19 to 4.84 microg/L v 0.05 microg/L; range, 0.02 to 0.27 microg/L; and 0.09 microg/L; range, 0.02 to 0.15 microg/L, respectively; P <.05, ANOVA). Among patients with FHF, blood levels of NSE tended to be greater in patients who subsequently developed cerebral herniation than in survivors (median, 10.5 microg/L; range, 5.2 to 15.9 microg/L v 5.1 microg/L; range, 2.8 to 12 microg/L; P =.05). There was no net cerebral flux of S-100b or NSE. Short-term hyperventilation had no effect on any of these measures, whereas high-volume plasmapheresis reduced circulating S-100b levels from 0.45 microg/L (range, 0.19 to 10.31 microg/L) to 0.42 microg/L (range, 0.11 to 6.35 microg/L; P =.01). In conclusion, blood levels of S-100b were elevated in almost all patients with FHF and AOCLD, but were unrelated to survival. Conversely, NSE showed a clear tendency toward greater circulating levels in patients with FHF who subsequently developed cerebral herniation than in survivors. This finding encourages further evaluation of NSE as a marker of neurological outcome in FHF.",
author = "Strauss, {Gitte Irene} and Michael Christiansen and Kirsten M{\o}ller and Clemmesen, {Jens Otto} and Larsen, {Finn Stolze} and Knudsen, {Karen Birgitte Moos}",
year = "2001",
month = "12",
day = "31",
language = "English",
volume = "7",
pages = "964--970",
journal = "Liver Transplantation",
issn = "1527-6465",
publisher = "JohnWiley & Sons, Inc.",
number = "11",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - S-100b and neuron-specific enolase in patients with fulminant hepatic failure

AU - Strauss, Gitte Irene

AU - Christiansen, Michael

AU - Møller, Kirsten

AU - Clemmesen, Jens Otto

AU - Larsen, Finn Stolze

AU - Knudsen, Karen Birgitte Moos

PY - 2001/12/31

Y1 - 2001/12/31

N2 - Patients with fulminant hepatic failure (FHF) frequently develop cerebral edema and intracranial hypertension. The aim of this study was to evaluate circulating S-100b and neuron-specific enolase (NSE) levels as markers of neurological outcome in patients with FHF. In a subgroup of patients, the cerebral flux of S-100b and NSE was measured. We included 35 patients with FHF, 6 patients with acute on chronic liver disease (AOCLD), 13 patients with cirrhosis of the liver without hepatic encephalopathy, and 8 healthy subjects. Blood samples were obtained from catheters placed in the radial artery and internal jugular bulb. The net cerebral flux of S-100b and NSE was measured, and the effect of short-term hyperventilation, as well as the effect of high-volume plasmapheresis, on circulating levels of these two biomarkers was determined. Blood levels of S-100b were greater in patients with FHF and AOCLD than patients with cirrhosis and healthy subjects (median, 0.39 microg/L; range, 0.02 to 10.31 microg/L; and 1.11 microg/L; range, 0.19 to 4.84 microg/L v 0.05 microg/L; range, 0.02 to 0.27 microg/L; and 0.09 microg/L; range, 0.02 to 0.15 microg/L, respectively; P <.05, ANOVA). Among patients with FHF, blood levels of NSE tended to be greater in patients who subsequently developed cerebral herniation than in survivors (median, 10.5 microg/L; range, 5.2 to 15.9 microg/L v 5.1 microg/L; range, 2.8 to 12 microg/L; P =.05). There was no net cerebral flux of S-100b or NSE. Short-term hyperventilation had no effect on any of these measures, whereas high-volume plasmapheresis reduced circulating S-100b levels from 0.45 microg/L (range, 0.19 to 10.31 microg/L) to 0.42 microg/L (range, 0.11 to 6.35 microg/L; P =.01). In conclusion, blood levels of S-100b were elevated in almost all patients with FHF and AOCLD, but were unrelated to survival. Conversely, NSE showed a clear tendency toward greater circulating levels in patients with FHF who subsequently developed cerebral herniation than in survivors. This finding encourages further evaluation of NSE as a marker of neurological outcome in FHF.

AB - Patients with fulminant hepatic failure (FHF) frequently develop cerebral edema and intracranial hypertension. The aim of this study was to evaluate circulating S-100b and neuron-specific enolase (NSE) levels as markers of neurological outcome in patients with FHF. In a subgroup of patients, the cerebral flux of S-100b and NSE was measured. We included 35 patients with FHF, 6 patients with acute on chronic liver disease (AOCLD), 13 patients with cirrhosis of the liver without hepatic encephalopathy, and 8 healthy subjects. Blood samples were obtained from catheters placed in the radial artery and internal jugular bulb. The net cerebral flux of S-100b and NSE was measured, and the effect of short-term hyperventilation, as well as the effect of high-volume plasmapheresis, on circulating levels of these two biomarkers was determined. Blood levels of S-100b were greater in patients with FHF and AOCLD than patients with cirrhosis and healthy subjects (median, 0.39 microg/L; range, 0.02 to 10.31 microg/L; and 1.11 microg/L; range, 0.19 to 4.84 microg/L v 0.05 microg/L; range, 0.02 to 0.27 microg/L; and 0.09 microg/L; range, 0.02 to 0.15 microg/L, respectively; P <.05, ANOVA). Among patients with FHF, blood levels of NSE tended to be greater in patients who subsequently developed cerebral herniation than in survivors (median, 10.5 microg/L; range, 5.2 to 15.9 microg/L v 5.1 microg/L; range, 2.8 to 12 microg/L; P =.05). There was no net cerebral flux of S-100b or NSE. Short-term hyperventilation had no effect on any of these measures, whereas high-volume plasmapheresis reduced circulating S-100b levels from 0.45 microg/L (range, 0.19 to 10.31 microg/L) to 0.42 microg/L (range, 0.11 to 6.35 microg/L; P =.01). In conclusion, blood levels of S-100b were elevated in almost all patients with FHF and AOCLD, but were unrelated to survival. Conversely, NSE showed a clear tendency toward greater circulating levels in patients with FHF who subsequently developed cerebral herniation than in survivors. This finding encourages further evaluation of NSE as a marker of neurological outcome in FHF.

M3 - Journal article

VL - 7

SP - 964

EP - 970

JO - Liver Transplantation

JF - Liver Transplantation

SN - 1527-6465

IS - 11

ER -

ID: 162987576