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Self-reported physical activity compared with maximal oxygen uptake in adults

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Self-reported physical activity compared with maximal oxygen uptake in adults. / Aadahl, Mette; Kjær, Michael; Kristensen, Jens H.; Mollerup, Birgit; Jørgensen, Torben.

I: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Bind 14, Nr. 3, 06.2007, s. 422-428.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningfagfællebedømt

Harvard

Aadahl, M, Kjær, M, Kristensen, JH, Mollerup, B & Jørgensen, T 2007, 'Self-reported physical activity compared with maximal oxygen uptake in adults', European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, bind 14, nr. 3, s. 422-428. https://doi.org/10.1097/HJR.0b013e3280128d00

APA

Aadahl, M., Kjær, M., Kristensen, J. H., Mollerup, B., & Jørgensen, T. (2007). Self-reported physical activity compared with maximal oxygen uptake in adults. European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, 14(3), 422-428. https://doi.org/10.1097/HJR.0b013e3280128d00

Vancouver

Aadahl M, Kjær M, Kristensen JH, Mollerup B, Jørgensen T. Self-reported physical activity compared with maximal oxygen uptake in adults. European Journal of Preventive Cardiology. 2007 jun;14(3):422-428. https://doi.org/10.1097/HJR.0b013e3280128d00

Author

Aadahl, Mette ; Kjær, Michael ; Kristensen, Jens H. ; Mollerup, Birgit ; Jørgensen, Torben. / Self-reported physical activity compared with maximal oxygen uptake in adults. I: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology. 2007 ; Bind 14, Nr. 3. s. 422-428.

Bibtex

@article{b126a17a66ec4c4ba17f8c879b70cefa,
title = "Self-reported physical activity compared with maximal oxygen uptake in adults",
abstract = "Physical activity level and cardiorespiratory fitness are both inversely associated with the risk of cardiovascular diseases and with all-cause mortality. Physical activity questionnaires are often validated against objectively measured maximal oxygen uptake (Vo2max). To validate a self-report physical activity questionnaire against Vo2max and furthermore to establish whether a simple question on self-rated physical fitness could predict objectively measured Vo2max. A total of 102 men and women aged between 35 and 65 years were recruited from an ongoing population-based intervention study, the Inter99 Study. Participants reported their self-rated fitness and daily physical activity using a new questionnaire based on metabolic equivalents (MET). Vo2max (ml/kg per min) was determined using a graded bicycle test with increasing workload until exhaustion and with simultaneous measurement of breath-to-breath oxygen uptake in 15-s periods. Statistical analyses were performed by linear regression analyses using the self-reported physical activity level as an independent variable and Vo2max (l/min) as an dependent variable, and with covariates sex, age and bodyweight. Data from 53 men and 47 women were analysed. The amount of daily vigorous activity (>6 MET) was significantly positively associated with Vo2max (P=0.0001, R 2 = 0.76), whereas the total amount of physical activity was not significantly associated with Vo2max (P=0.098, R 2 = 0.69). A significant trend across three groups of self-rated fitness in relation to Vo2max (ml/kg per min) was found (P for trend <0.0001). The physical activity questionnaire has acceptable validity when compared with Vo2max in adult men and women. Furthermore, a simple question on self-rated fitness seems to reflect measured Vo2max objectively.",
keywords = "maximal oxygen uptake, physical activity, questionnaire, validation",
author = "Mette Aadahl and Michael Kj{\ae}r and Kristensen, {Jens H.} and Birgit Mollerup and Torben J{\o}rgensen",
year = "2007",
month = "6",
doi = "10.1097/HJR.0b013e3280128d00",
language = "English",
volume = "14",
pages = "422--428",
journal = "European Journal of Preventive Cardiology",
issn = "2047-4873",
publisher = "SAGE Publications",
number = "3",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Self-reported physical activity compared with maximal oxygen uptake in adults

AU - Aadahl, Mette

AU - Kjær, Michael

AU - Kristensen, Jens H.

AU - Mollerup, Birgit

AU - Jørgensen, Torben

PY - 2007/6

Y1 - 2007/6

N2 - Physical activity level and cardiorespiratory fitness are both inversely associated with the risk of cardiovascular diseases and with all-cause mortality. Physical activity questionnaires are often validated against objectively measured maximal oxygen uptake (Vo2max). To validate a self-report physical activity questionnaire against Vo2max and furthermore to establish whether a simple question on self-rated physical fitness could predict objectively measured Vo2max. A total of 102 men and women aged between 35 and 65 years were recruited from an ongoing population-based intervention study, the Inter99 Study. Participants reported their self-rated fitness and daily physical activity using a new questionnaire based on metabolic equivalents (MET). Vo2max (ml/kg per min) was determined using a graded bicycle test with increasing workload until exhaustion and with simultaneous measurement of breath-to-breath oxygen uptake in 15-s periods. Statistical analyses were performed by linear regression analyses using the self-reported physical activity level as an independent variable and Vo2max (l/min) as an dependent variable, and with covariates sex, age and bodyweight. Data from 53 men and 47 women were analysed. The amount of daily vigorous activity (>6 MET) was significantly positively associated with Vo2max (P=0.0001, R 2 = 0.76), whereas the total amount of physical activity was not significantly associated with Vo2max (P=0.098, R 2 = 0.69). A significant trend across three groups of self-rated fitness in relation to Vo2max (ml/kg per min) was found (P for trend <0.0001). The physical activity questionnaire has acceptable validity when compared with Vo2max in adult men and women. Furthermore, a simple question on self-rated fitness seems to reflect measured Vo2max objectively.

AB - Physical activity level and cardiorespiratory fitness are both inversely associated with the risk of cardiovascular diseases and with all-cause mortality. Physical activity questionnaires are often validated against objectively measured maximal oxygen uptake (Vo2max). To validate a self-report physical activity questionnaire against Vo2max and furthermore to establish whether a simple question on self-rated physical fitness could predict objectively measured Vo2max. A total of 102 men and women aged between 35 and 65 years were recruited from an ongoing population-based intervention study, the Inter99 Study. Participants reported their self-rated fitness and daily physical activity using a new questionnaire based on metabolic equivalents (MET). Vo2max (ml/kg per min) was determined using a graded bicycle test with increasing workload until exhaustion and with simultaneous measurement of breath-to-breath oxygen uptake in 15-s periods. Statistical analyses were performed by linear regression analyses using the self-reported physical activity level as an independent variable and Vo2max (l/min) as an dependent variable, and with covariates sex, age and bodyweight. Data from 53 men and 47 women were analysed. The amount of daily vigorous activity (>6 MET) was significantly positively associated with Vo2max (P=0.0001, R 2 = 0.76), whereas the total amount of physical activity was not significantly associated with Vo2max (P=0.098, R 2 = 0.69). A significant trend across three groups of self-rated fitness in relation to Vo2max (ml/kg per min) was found (P for trend <0.0001). The physical activity questionnaire has acceptable validity when compared with Vo2max in adult men and women. Furthermore, a simple question on self-rated fitness seems to reflect measured Vo2max objectively.

KW - maximal oxygen uptake

KW - physical activity

KW - questionnaire

KW - validation

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=34250627198&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1097/HJR.0b013e3280128d00

DO - 10.1097/HJR.0b013e3280128d00

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 17568243

AN - SCOPUS:34250627198

VL - 14

SP - 422

EP - 428

JO - European Journal of Preventive Cardiology

JF - European Journal of Preventive Cardiology

SN - 2047-4873

IS - 3

ER -

ID: 242208721