Forskning ved Københavns Universitet - Københavns Universitet

Forside

Sex differences of human cortical blood flow and energy metabolism

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningfagfællebedømt

Standard

Sex differences of human cortical blood flow and energy metabolism. / Aanerud, Joel; Borghammer, Per; Rodell, Anders; Jonsdottir, Kristjana Y.; Gjedde, Albert.

I: Journal of Cerebral Blood Flow and Metabolism, Bind 37, Nr. 7, 2017, s. 2433-2440.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningfagfællebedømt

Harvard

Aanerud, J, Borghammer, P, Rodell, A, Jonsdottir, KY & Gjedde, A 2017, 'Sex differences of human cortical blood flow and energy metabolism', Journal of Cerebral Blood Flow and Metabolism, bind 37, nr. 7, s. 2433-2440. https://doi.org/10.1177/0271678X16668536

APA

Aanerud, J., Borghammer, P., Rodell, A., Jonsdottir, K. Y., & Gjedde, A. (2017). Sex differences of human cortical blood flow and energy metabolism. Journal of Cerebral Blood Flow and Metabolism, 37(7), 2433-2440. https://doi.org/10.1177/0271678X16668536

Vancouver

Aanerud J, Borghammer P, Rodell A, Jonsdottir KY, Gjedde A. Sex differences of human cortical blood flow and energy metabolism. Journal of Cerebral Blood Flow and Metabolism. 2017;37(7):2433-2440. https://doi.org/10.1177/0271678X16668536

Author

Aanerud, Joel ; Borghammer, Per ; Rodell, Anders ; Jonsdottir, Kristjana Y. ; Gjedde, Albert. / Sex differences of human cortical blood flow and energy metabolism. I: Journal of Cerebral Blood Flow and Metabolism. 2017 ; Bind 37, Nr. 7. s. 2433-2440.

Bibtex

@article{0621bf18804e40e9b28b8ac5fa6bbedb,
title = "Sex differences of human cortical blood flow and energy metabolism",
abstract = "Brain energy metabolism is held to reflect energy demanding processes in neuropil related to the density and activity of synapses. There is recent evidence that men have higher density of synapses in temporal cortex than women. One consequence of these differences would be different rates of cortical energy turnover and blood flow in men and women. To test the hypotheses that rates of oxygen consumption (CMRO2) and cerebral blood flow are higher in men than in women in regions of cerebral cortex, and that the differences persist with aging, we used positron emission tomography to determine cerebral blood flow and cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen as functions of age in healthy volunteers of both sexes. Cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen did not change with age for either sex and there were no differences of mean values of cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen between men and women in cerebral cortex. Women had significant decreases of cerebral blood flow as function of age in frontal and parietal lobes. Young women had significantly higher cerebral blood flow than men in frontal and temporal lobes, but these differences had disappeared at age 65. The absent sex difference of cerebral energy turnover suggests that the known differences of synaptic density between the sexes are counteracted by opposite differences of individual synaptic activity.",
keywords = "Aging, cerebral blood flow measurement, energy metabolism, gender, positron emission tomography",
author = "Joel Aanerud and Per Borghammer and Anders Rodell and Jonsdottir, {Kristjana Y.} and Albert Gjedde",
year = "2017",
doi = "10.1177/0271678X16668536",
language = "English",
volume = "37",
pages = "2433--2440",
journal = "Journal of Cerebral Blood Flow and Metabolism",
issn = "0271-678X",
publisher = "SAGE Publications",
number = "7",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Sex differences of human cortical blood flow and energy metabolism

AU - Aanerud, Joel

AU - Borghammer, Per

AU - Rodell, Anders

AU - Jonsdottir, Kristjana Y.

AU - Gjedde, Albert

PY - 2017

Y1 - 2017

N2 - Brain energy metabolism is held to reflect energy demanding processes in neuropil related to the density and activity of synapses. There is recent evidence that men have higher density of synapses in temporal cortex than women. One consequence of these differences would be different rates of cortical energy turnover and blood flow in men and women. To test the hypotheses that rates of oxygen consumption (CMRO2) and cerebral blood flow are higher in men than in women in regions of cerebral cortex, and that the differences persist with aging, we used positron emission tomography to determine cerebral blood flow and cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen as functions of age in healthy volunteers of both sexes. Cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen did not change with age for either sex and there were no differences of mean values of cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen between men and women in cerebral cortex. Women had significant decreases of cerebral blood flow as function of age in frontal and parietal lobes. Young women had significantly higher cerebral blood flow than men in frontal and temporal lobes, but these differences had disappeared at age 65. The absent sex difference of cerebral energy turnover suggests that the known differences of synaptic density between the sexes are counteracted by opposite differences of individual synaptic activity.

AB - Brain energy metabolism is held to reflect energy demanding processes in neuropil related to the density and activity of synapses. There is recent evidence that men have higher density of synapses in temporal cortex than women. One consequence of these differences would be different rates of cortical energy turnover and blood flow in men and women. To test the hypotheses that rates of oxygen consumption (CMRO2) and cerebral blood flow are higher in men than in women in regions of cerebral cortex, and that the differences persist with aging, we used positron emission tomography to determine cerebral blood flow and cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen as functions of age in healthy volunteers of both sexes. Cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen did not change with age for either sex and there were no differences of mean values of cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen between men and women in cerebral cortex. Women had significant decreases of cerebral blood flow as function of age in frontal and parietal lobes. Young women had significantly higher cerebral blood flow than men in frontal and temporal lobes, but these differences had disappeared at age 65. The absent sex difference of cerebral energy turnover suggests that the known differences of synaptic density between the sexes are counteracted by opposite differences of individual synaptic activity.

KW - Aging

KW - cerebral blood flow measurement

KW - energy metabolism

KW - gender

KW - positron emission tomography

U2 - 10.1177/0271678X16668536

DO - 10.1177/0271678X16668536

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 27629099

VL - 37

SP - 2433

EP - 2440

JO - Journal of Cerebral Blood Flow and Metabolism

JF - Journal of Cerebral Blood Flow and Metabolism

SN - 0271-678X

IS - 7

ER -

ID: 182538831