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Should we be afraid of medical AI?

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Standard

Should we be afraid of medical AI? / Di Nucci, Ezio.

I: Journal of Medical Ethics, Bind 45, Nr. 8, 2019, s. 556-558.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningfagfællebedømt

Harvard

Di Nucci, E 2019, 'Should we be afraid of medical AI?', Journal of Medical Ethics, bind 45, nr. 8, s. 556-558. https://doi.org/10.1136/medethics-2018-105281

APA

Di Nucci, E. (2019). Should we be afraid of medical AI? Journal of Medical Ethics, 45(8), 556-558. https://doi.org/10.1136/medethics-2018-105281

Vancouver

Di Nucci E. Should we be afraid of medical AI? Journal of Medical Ethics. 2019;45(8):556-558. https://doi.org/10.1136/medethics-2018-105281

Author

Di Nucci, Ezio. / Should we be afraid of medical AI?. I: Journal of Medical Ethics. 2019 ; Bind 45, Nr. 8. s. 556-558.

Bibtex

@article{a73afd426a8f49beb5dca546a849701b,
title = "Should we be afraid of medical AI?",
abstract = "I analyse an argument according to which medical artificial intelligence (AI) represents a threat to patient autonomy—recently put forward by Rosalind McDougall in the Journal of Medical Ethics. The argument takes the case of IBM Watson for Oncology to argue that such technologies risk disregarding the individual values and wishes of patients. I find three problems with this argument: (1) it confuses AI with machine learning; (2) it misses machine learning{\textquoteright}s potential for personalised medicine through big data; (3) it fails to distinguish between evidence-based advice and decision-making within healthcare. I conclude that how much and which tasks we should delegate to machine learning and other technologies within healthcare and beyond is indeed a crucial question of our time, but in order to answer it, we must be careful in analysing and properly distinguish between the different systems and different delegated tasks.",
author = "{Di Nucci}, Ezio",
year = "2019",
doi = "10.1136/medethics-2018-105281",
language = "English",
volume = "45",
pages = "556--558",
journal = "Journal of Medical Ethics",
issn = "0306-6800",
publisher = "BMJ Publishing Group",
number = "8",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Should we be afraid of medical AI?

AU - Di Nucci, Ezio

PY - 2019

Y1 - 2019

N2 - I analyse an argument according to which medical artificial intelligence (AI) represents a threat to patient autonomy—recently put forward by Rosalind McDougall in the Journal of Medical Ethics. The argument takes the case of IBM Watson for Oncology to argue that such technologies risk disregarding the individual values and wishes of patients. I find three problems with this argument: (1) it confuses AI with machine learning; (2) it misses machine learning’s potential for personalised medicine through big data; (3) it fails to distinguish between evidence-based advice and decision-making within healthcare. I conclude that how much and which tasks we should delegate to machine learning and other technologies within healthcare and beyond is indeed a crucial question of our time, but in order to answer it, we must be careful in analysing and properly distinguish between the different systems and different delegated tasks.

AB - I analyse an argument according to which medical artificial intelligence (AI) represents a threat to patient autonomy—recently put forward by Rosalind McDougall in the Journal of Medical Ethics. The argument takes the case of IBM Watson for Oncology to argue that such technologies risk disregarding the individual values and wishes of patients. I find three problems with this argument: (1) it confuses AI with machine learning; (2) it misses machine learning’s potential for personalised medicine through big data; (3) it fails to distinguish between evidence-based advice and decision-making within healthcare. I conclude that how much and which tasks we should delegate to machine learning and other technologies within healthcare and beyond is indeed a crucial question of our time, but in order to answer it, we must be careful in analysing and properly distinguish between the different systems and different delegated tasks.

U2 - 10.1136/medethics-2018-105281

DO - 10.1136/medethics-2018-105281

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 31227547

VL - 45

SP - 556

EP - 558

JO - Journal of Medical Ethics

JF - Journal of Medical Ethics

SN - 0306-6800

IS - 8

ER -

ID: 222970949