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The Forgotten Property Rights: Restrictions on Land Use in Vietnam

Publikation: Working paperForskning

Standard

The Forgotten Property Rights : Restrictions on Land Use in Vietnam. / Markussen, Thomas; Tarp, Finn; Van Den Broeck, Katleen.

Department of Economics, University of Copenhagen, 2009.

Publikation: Working paperForskning

Harvard

Markussen, T, Tarp, F & Van Den Broeck, K 2009 'The Forgotten Property Rights: Restrictions on Land Use in Vietnam' Department of Economics, University of Copenhagen.

APA

Markussen, T., Tarp, F., & Van Den Broeck, K. (2009). The Forgotten Property Rights: Restrictions on Land Use in Vietnam. Department of Economics, University of Copenhagen.

Vancouver

Markussen T, Tarp F, Van Den Broeck K. The Forgotten Property Rights: Restrictions on Land Use in Vietnam. Department of Economics, University of Copenhagen. 2009.

Author

Markussen, Thomas ; Tarp, Finn ; Van Den Broeck, Katleen. / The Forgotten Property Rights : Restrictions on Land Use in Vietnam. Department of Economics, University of Copenhagen, 2009.

Bibtex

@techreport{546489b0a90111debc73000ea68e967b,
title = "The Forgotten Property Rights: Restrictions on Land Use in Vietnam",
abstract = "Studies of land property rights usually focus on tenure security and transfer rights. Rights to determine how to use the land are regularly ignored. However, in transition economies such as Vietnam and China, user rights are often limited. Relying on a unique Vietnamese panel data set at both household and plot level, we show that crop choice restrictions are widespread and prevent crop diversification. Restrictions do not decrease household income, but restricted households work harder, and there are indications that they are supplied with higher quality inputs. Our findings are consistent with the view that the Vietnamese government has managed to intervene effectively in agricultural (rice) production to promote output and food security. At the same time, it is now time to carefully consider the potential benefits of a more diversified crop pattern.",
keywords = "Faculty of Social Sciences",
author = "Thomas Markussen and Finn Tarp and {Van Den Broeck}, Katleen",
note = "JEL classification: D1, O1, Q1",
year = "2009",
language = "English",
publisher = "Department of Economics, University of Copenhagen",
address = "Denmark",
type = "WorkingPaper",
institution = "Department of Economics, University of Copenhagen",

}

RIS

TY - UNPB

T1 - The Forgotten Property Rights

T2 - Restrictions on Land Use in Vietnam

AU - Markussen, Thomas

AU - Tarp, Finn

AU - Van Den Broeck, Katleen

N1 - JEL classification: D1, O1, Q1

PY - 2009

Y1 - 2009

N2 - Studies of land property rights usually focus on tenure security and transfer rights. Rights to determine how to use the land are regularly ignored. However, in transition economies such as Vietnam and China, user rights are often limited. Relying on a unique Vietnamese panel data set at both household and plot level, we show that crop choice restrictions are widespread and prevent crop diversification. Restrictions do not decrease household income, but restricted households work harder, and there are indications that they are supplied with higher quality inputs. Our findings are consistent with the view that the Vietnamese government has managed to intervene effectively in agricultural (rice) production to promote output and food security. At the same time, it is now time to carefully consider the potential benefits of a more diversified crop pattern.

AB - Studies of land property rights usually focus on tenure security and transfer rights. Rights to determine how to use the land are regularly ignored. However, in transition economies such as Vietnam and China, user rights are often limited. Relying on a unique Vietnamese panel data set at both household and plot level, we show that crop choice restrictions are widespread and prevent crop diversification. Restrictions do not decrease household income, but restricted households work harder, and there are indications that they are supplied with higher quality inputs. Our findings are consistent with the view that the Vietnamese government has managed to intervene effectively in agricultural (rice) production to promote output and food security. At the same time, it is now time to carefully consider the potential benefits of a more diversified crop pattern.

KW - Faculty of Social Sciences

M3 - Working paper

BT - The Forgotten Property Rights

PB - Department of Economics, University of Copenhagen

ER -

ID: 14668696