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Timelapse scanning reveals spatial variation in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) root elongation rates during partial waterlogging

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Standard

Timelapse scanning reveals spatial variation in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) root elongation rates during partial waterlogging. / Dresbøll, Dorte Bodin; Thorup-Kristensen, Kristian; McKenzie, Blair M.; Dupuy, Lionel Xavier; Bengough, A. Glyn.

I: Plant and Soil, Bind 369, Nr. 1-2, 2013, s. 467-477.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningfagfællebedømt

Harvard

Dresbøll, DB, Thorup-Kristensen, K, McKenzie, BM, Dupuy, LX & Bengough, AG 2013, 'Timelapse scanning reveals spatial variation in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) root elongation rates during partial waterlogging', Plant and Soil, bind 369, nr. 1-2, s. 467-477. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11104-013-1592-5

APA

Dresbøll, D. B., Thorup-Kristensen, K., McKenzie, B. M., Dupuy, L. X., & Bengough, A. G. (2013). Timelapse scanning reveals spatial variation in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) root elongation rates during partial waterlogging. Plant and Soil, 369(1-2), 467-477. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11104-013-1592-5

Vancouver

Dresbøll DB, Thorup-Kristensen K, McKenzie BM, Dupuy LX, Bengough AG. Timelapse scanning reveals spatial variation in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) root elongation rates during partial waterlogging. Plant and Soil. 2013;369(1-2):467-477. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11104-013-1592-5

Author

Dresbøll, Dorte Bodin ; Thorup-Kristensen, Kristian ; McKenzie, Blair M. ; Dupuy, Lionel Xavier ; Bengough, A. Glyn. / Timelapse scanning reveals spatial variation in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) root elongation rates during partial waterlogging. I: Plant and Soil. 2013 ; Bind 369, Nr. 1-2. s. 467-477.

Bibtex

@article{d69ddf2cdf324ee2844da68e5bebdae5,
title = "Timelapse scanning reveals spatial variation in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) root elongation rates during partial waterlogging",
abstract = "Background and aimsRoot systems show considerable plasticity in their morphology and physiology in response to variability within their environment. Root elongation below a water-table was expected to slow due to hypoxia, whilst roots above the waterlogged zone were expected to compensate by increasing elongation rates.MethodsTomato plants (Solanum lycopersicum L.) were grown in peat in root chambers (300 × 215 × 6 mm) with a transparent front. Root chambers were maintained in flatbed scanners tilted at 30° to vertical and scanned every 3 h before, during and after waterlogging the lower layer for 24 h or 5 days. Root elongation rates were calculated from the displacement of randomly selected root tips between successive scans. Oxygen content was determined in the waterlogged layer and plant and root parameters were determined at cessation of the experiment.ResultsRoot elongation rates decreased rapidly when waterlogged. Growth rates of the waterlogged roots decreased, while growth rates of roots above the waterlogged zone increased. In 24 h waterlogged roots new lateral root growth occurred in the lower layer of the root chamber when water was drained while after 5 day waterlogging new root growth had to be initiated from roots above the waterlogged zone.ConclusionsPlants increased growth rates in roots above the waterlogged zone probably as compensation for the suboptimal conditions in the waterlogged zone which eventually led to roots dying",
author = "Dresb{\o}ll, {Dorte Bodin} and Kristian Thorup-Kristensen and McKenzie, {Blair M.} and Dupuy, {Lionel Xavier} and Bengough, {A. Glyn}",
year = "2013",
doi = "10.1007/s11104-013-1592-5",
language = "English",
volume = "369",
pages = "467--477",
journal = "Plant and Soil",
issn = "0032-079X",
publisher = "Springer",
number = "1-2",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Timelapse scanning reveals spatial variation in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) root elongation rates during partial waterlogging

AU - Dresbøll, Dorte Bodin

AU - Thorup-Kristensen, Kristian

AU - McKenzie, Blair M.

AU - Dupuy, Lionel Xavier

AU - Bengough, A. Glyn

PY - 2013

Y1 - 2013

N2 - Background and aimsRoot systems show considerable plasticity in their morphology and physiology in response to variability within their environment. Root elongation below a water-table was expected to slow due to hypoxia, whilst roots above the waterlogged zone were expected to compensate by increasing elongation rates.MethodsTomato plants (Solanum lycopersicum L.) were grown in peat in root chambers (300 × 215 × 6 mm) with a transparent front. Root chambers were maintained in flatbed scanners tilted at 30° to vertical and scanned every 3 h before, during and after waterlogging the lower layer for 24 h or 5 days. Root elongation rates were calculated from the displacement of randomly selected root tips between successive scans. Oxygen content was determined in the waterlogged layer and plant and root parameters were determined at cessation of the experiment.ResultsRoot elongation rates decreased rapidly when waterlogged. Growth rates of the waterlogged roots decreased, while growth rates of roots above the waterlogged zone increased. In 24 h waterlogged roots new lateral root growth occurred in the lower layer of the root chamber when water was drained while after 5 day waterlogging new root growth had to be initiated from roots above the waterlogged zone.ConclusionsPlants increased growth rates in roots above the waterlogged zone probably as compensation for the suboptimal conditions in the waterlogged zone which eventually led to roots dying

AB - Background and aimsRoot systems show considerable plasticity in their morphology and physiology in response to variability within their environment. Root elongation below a water-table was expected to slow due to hypoxia, whilst roots above the waterlogged zone were expected to compensate by increasing elongation rates.MethodsTomato plants (Solanum lycopersicum L.) were grown in peat in root chambers (300 × 215 × 6 mm) with a transparent front. Root chambers were maintained in flatbed scanners tilted at 30° to vertical and scanned every 3 h before, during and after waterlogging the lower layer for 24 h or 5 days. Root elongation rates were calculated from the displacement of randomly selected root tips between successive scans. Oxygen content was determined in the waterlogged layer and plant and root parameters were determined at cessation of the experiment.ResultsRoot elongation rates decreased rapidly when waterlogged. Growth rates of the waterlogged roots decreased, while growth rates of roots above the waterlogged zone increased. In 24 h waterlogged roots new lateral root growth occurred in the lower layer of the root chamber when water was drained while after 5 day waterlogging new root growth had to be initiated from roots above the waterlogged zone.ConclusionsPlants increased growth rates in roots above the waterlogged zone probably as compensation for the suboptimal conditions in the waterlogged zone which eventually led to roots dying

U2 - 10.1007/s11104-013-1592-5

DO - 10.1007/s11104-013-1592-5

M3 - Journal article

VL - 369

SP - 467

EP - 477

JO - Plant and Soil

JF - Plant and Soil

SN - 0032-079X

IS - 1-2

ER -

ID: 47453782