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Unexpectedly high beta-diversity of root-associated fungal communities in the Bolivian Andes

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Standard

Unexpectedly high beta-diversity of root-associated fungal communities in the Bolivian Andes. / Barnes, Christopher James; Maldonado Goyzueta, Carla Brenda; Frøslev, Tobias Guldberg; Antonelli, Alexandre; Rønsted, Nina.

I: Frontiers in Microbiology, Bind 7, 1377, 2016.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningfagfællebedømt

Harvard

Barnes, CJ, Maldonado Goyzueta, CB, Frøslev, TG, Antonelli, A & Rønsted, N 2016, 'Unexpectedly high beta-diversity of root-associated fungal communities in the Bolivian Andes', Frontiers in Microbiology, bind 7, 1377. https://doi.org/10.3389/fmicb.2016.01377

APA

Barnes, C. J., Maldonado Goyzueta, C. B., Frøslev, T. G., Antonelli, A., & Rønsted, N. (2016). Unexpectedly high beta-diversity of root-associated fungal communities in the Bolivian Andes. Frontiers in Microbiology, 7, [1377]. https://doi.org/10.3389/fmicb.2016.01377

Vancouver

Barnes CJ, Maldonado Goyzueta CB, Frøslev TG, Antonelli A, Rønsted N. Unexpectedly high beta-diversity of root-associated fungal communities in the Bolivian Andes. Frontiers in Microbiology. 2016;7. 1377. https://doi.org/10.3389/fmicb.2016.01377

Author

Barnes, Christopher James ; Maldonado Goyzueta, Carla Brenda ; Frøslev, Tobias Guldberg ; Antonelli, Alexandre ; Rønsted, Nina. / Unexpectedly high beta-diversity of root-associated fungal communities in the Bolivian Andes. I: Frontiers in Microbiology. 2016 ; Bind 7.

Bibtex

@article{5e41258d5efb4495a6f96d7ed74fcfbd,
title = "Unexpectedly high beta-diversity of root-associated fungal communities in the Bolivian Andes",
abstract = "Bolivia is one of the most biologically diverse countries on the planet. Between the Andes and the Amazon drainage basin spans the Yungas, a vast forested region shown to be extremely species rich in macro-organisms. However, it remains unclear whether this high diversity is also reflected in microbial diversity. Here we assess the genetic, taxonomic and functional diversity of root-associated fungi surrounding Cinchona calisaya calisaya trees, a typical element of the intermediate altitudes of the Bolivian Yungas. We determine the relative effects of edaphic properties, climate, and geography in regulating fungal community assembly. We show that α-diversity for these fungal communities was similar to temperate and arid ecosystems, averaging 90.1 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) per sample, with reads predominantly assigned to the Ascomycota phylum and with a saprotrophic lifestyle. {\ss}-diversity was calculated as the distance-decay rate, and in contrast to α-diversity, was exceptionally high with a rate of -0.407. Soil properties (pH and P) principally regulated fungal community assembly in an analogous manner to temperate environments, with pH and phosphorus explaining 7.8 {\%} and 7.2 {\%} of community variation respectively. Surprisingly, altitude does not influence community formation, and there is limited evidence that climate (precipitation and temperature) play a role. Our results suggest that sampling should be performed over a wide geographical and environmental range in order to capture the full root-associated fungal diversity in subtropical regions. This study sheds further light on the diversity and distribution of the world's {"}hidden biodiversity{"}.",
author = "Barnes, {Christopher James} and {Maldonado Goyzueta}, {Carla Brenda} and Fr{\o}slev, {Tobias Guldberg} and Alexandre Antonelli and Nina R{\o}nsted",
year = "2016",
doi = "10.3389/fmicb.2016.01377",
language = "English",
volume = "7",
journal = "Frontiers in Microbiology",
issn = "1664-302X",
publisher = "Frontiers Media S.A.",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Unexpectedly high beta-diversity of root-associated fungal communities in the Bolivian Andes

AU - Barnes, Christopher James

AU - Maldonado Goyzueta, Carla Brenda

AU - Frøslev, Tobias Guldberg

AU - Antonelli, Alexandre

AU - Rønsted, Nina

PY - 2016

Y1 - 2016

N2 - Bolivia is one of the most biologically diverse countries on the planet. Between the Andes and the Amazon drainage basin spans the Yungas, a vast forested region shown to be extremely species rich in macro-organisms. However, it remains unclear whether this high diversity is also reflected in microbial diversity. Here we assess the genetic, taxonomic and functional diversity of root-associated fungi surrounding Cinchona calisaya calisaya trees, a typical element of the intermediate altitudes of the Bolivian Yungas. We determine the relative effects of edaphic properties, climate, and geography in regulating fungal community assembly. We show that α-diversity for these fungal communities was similar to temperate and arid ecosystems, averaging 90.1 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) per sample, with reads predominantly assigned to the Ascomycota phylum and with a saprotrophic lifestyle. ß-diversity was calculated as the distance-decay rate, and in contrast to α-diversity, was exceptionally high with a rate of -0.407. Soil properties (pH and P) principally regulated fungal community assembly in an analogous manner to temperate environments, with pH and phosphorus explaining 7.8 % and 7.2 % of community variation respectively. Surprisingly, altitude does not influence community formation, and there is limited evidence that climate (precipitation and temperature) play a role. Our results suggest that sampling should be performed over a wide geographical and environmental range in order to capture the full root-associated fungal diversity in subtropical regions. This study sheds further light on the diversity and distribution of the world's "hidden biodiversity".

AB - Bolivia is one of the most biologically diverse countries on the planet. Between the Andes and the Amazon drainage basin spans the Yungas, a vast forested region shown to be extremely species rich in macro-organisms. However, it remains unclear whether this high diversity is also reflected in microbial diversity. Here we assess the genetic, taxonomic and functional diversity of root-associated fungi surrounding Cinchona calisaya calisaya trees, a typical element of the intermediate altitudes of the Bolivian Yungas. We determine the relative effects of edaphic properties, climate, and geography in regulating fungal community assembly. We show that α-diversity for these fungal communities was similar to temperate and arid ecosystems, averaging 90.1 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) per sample, with reads predominantly assigned to the Ascomycota phylum and with a saprotrophic lifestyle. ß-diversity was calculated as the distance-decay rate, and in contrast to α-diversity, was exceptionally high with a rate of -0.407. Soil properties (pH and P) principally regulated fungal community assembly in an analogous manner to temperate environments, with pH and phosphorus explaining 7.8 % and 7.2 % of community variation respectively. Surprisingly, altitude does not influence community formation, and there is limited evidence that climate (precipitation and temperature) play a role. Our results suggest that sampling should be performed over a wide geographical and environmental range in order to capture the full root-associated fungal diversity in subtropical regions. This study sheds further light on the diversity and distribution of the world's "hidden biodiversity".

U2 - 10.3389/fmicb.2016.01377

DO - 10.3389/fmicb.2016.01377

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 27630629

VL - 7

JO - Frontiers in Microbiology

JF - Frontiers in Microbiology

SN - 1664-302X

M1 - 1377

ER -

ID: 164245186