Forskning ved Københavns Universitet - Københavns Universitet

Forside

Vitamin D status, liver enzymes, and incident liver disease and mortality: a general population study

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningfagfællebedømt

Standard

Vitamin D status, liver enzymes, and incident liver disease and mortality : a general population study. / Skaaby, Tea; Husemoen, Lise Lotte Nystrup; Borglykke, Anders; Jørgensen, Torben; Thuesen, Betina Heinsbæk; Pisinger, Charlotta; Schmidt, Lars Ebbe; Linneberg, Allan.

I: Endocrine, Bind 47, Nr. 1, 09.2014, s. 213-220.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningfagfællebedømt

Harvard

Skaaby, T, Husemoen, LLN, Borglykke, A, Jørgensen, T, Thuesen, BH, Pisinger, C, Schmidt, LE & Linneberg, A 2014, 'Vitamin D status, liver enzymes, and incident liver disease and mortality: a general population study', Endocrine, bind 47, nr. 1, s. 213-220. https://doi.org/10.1007/s12020-013-0107-8

APA

Skaaby, T., Husemoen, L. L. N., Borglykke, A., Jørgensen, T., Thuesen, B. H., Pisinger, C., ... Linneberg, A. (2014). Vitamin D status, liver enzymes, and incident liver disease and mortality: a general population study. Endocrine, 47(1), 213-220. https://doi.org/10.1007/s12020-013-0107-8

Vancouver

Skaaby T, Husemoen LLN, Borglykke A, Jørgensen T, Thuesen BH, Pisinger C o.a. Vitamin D status, liver enzymes, and incident liver disease and mortality: a general population study. Endocrine. 2014 sep;47(1):213-220. https://doi.org/10.1007/s12020-013-0107-8

Author

Skaaby, Tea ; Husemoen, Lise Lotte Nystrup ; Borglykke, Anders ; Jørgensen, Torben ; Thuesen, Betina Heinsbæk ; Pisinger, Charlotta ; Schmidt, Lars Ebbe ; Linneberg, Allan. / Vitamin D status, liver enzymes, and incident liver disease and mortality : a general population study. I: Endocrine. 2014 ; Bind 47, Nr. 1. s. 213-220.

Bibtex

@article{b670381cfe81449e8448148eabd17316,
title = "Vitamin D status, liver enzymes, and incident liver disease and mortality: a general population study",
abstract = "Vitamin D deficiency is common among patients with liver diseases. Both cholestatic and non-cholestatic liver diseases can cause vitamin D deficiency. Whether vitamin D status can also affect liver function is poorly understood. To investigate the association between vitamin D status, liver enzymes, and incident liver disease, we included a total of 2,649 individuals from the Monica10 study conducted in 1993-1994. Vitamin D status as assessed by serum 25-hydroxyvitamin, serum alanine transaminase (ALT), aspartate transaminase (AST), and gamma glutamyl transferase (GGT) were measured at baseline. Information on fatal and non-fatal liver disease was obtained from the Danish National Patient Register and The Danish Registry of Causes of Death, respectively. Median follow-up time was 16.5 years, and there were 62 incident cases of fatal and non-fatal liver disease. Multivariable Cox regression analyses with age as underlying time axis and delayed entry showed a statistically significant inverse association between vitamin D status and incident liver disease with a hazard ratio = 0.88 (95 {\%} confidence interval 0.79-0.99) per 10 nmol/l higher vitamin D status at baseline (adjusted for gender, season, alcohol consumption, smoking, physical activity, dietary habits, education, body mass index, and ALT). The risk of having a high level of ALT, AST, or GGT tended to be higher for lower vitamin D levels, although not statistically significant. In this general population study, vitamin D status was inversely associated with incident liver disease. Further studies are needed to determine whether patients in risk of developing impaired liver function should be screened for vitamin D deficiency for preventive purposes.",
keywords = "Adult, Aged, Denmark, Female, Humans, Incidence, Liver, Liver Diseases, Liver Function Tests, Male, Middle Aged, Mortality, Vitamin D, Vitamin D Deficiency",
author = "Tea Skaaby and Husemoen, {Lise Lotte Nystrup} and Anders Borglykke and Torben J{\o}rgensen and Thuesen, {Betina Heinsb{\ae}k} and Charlotta Pisinger and Schmidt, {Lars Ebbe} and Allan Linneberg",
year = "2014",
month = "9",
doi = "10.1007/s12020-013-0107-8",
language = "English",
volume = "47",
pages = "213--220",
journal = "Endocrine",
issn = "1355-008X",
publisher = "Humana Press",
number = "1",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Vitamin D status, liver enzymes, and incident liver disease and mortality

T2 - a general population study

AU - Skaaby, Tea

AU - Husemoen, Lise Lotte Nystrup

AU - Borglykke, Anders

AU - Jørgensen, Torben

AU - Thuesen, Betina Heinsbæk

AU - Pisinger, Charlotta

AU - Schmidt, Lars Ebbe

AU - Linneberg, Allan

PY - 2014/9

Y1 - 2014/9

N2 - Vitamin D deficiency is common among patients with liver diseases. Both cholestatic and non-cholestatic liver diseases can cause vitamin D deficiency. Whether vitamin D status can also affect liver function is poorly understood. To investigate the association between vitamin D status, liver enzymes, and incident liver disease, we included a total of 2,649 individuals from the Monica10 study conducted in 1993-1994. Vitamin D status as assessed by serum 25-hydroxyvitamin, serum alanine transaminase (ALT), aspartate transaminase (AST), and gamma glutamyl transferase (GGT) were measured at baseline. Information on fatal and non-fatal liver disease was obtained from the Danish National Patient Register and The Danish Registry of Causes of Death, respectively. Median follow-up time was 16.5 years, and there were 62 incident cases of fatal and non-fatal liver disease. Multivariable Cox regression analyses with age as underlying time axis and delayed entry showed a statistically significant inverse association between vitamin D status and incident liver disease with a hazard ratio = 0.88 (95 % confidence interval 0.79-0.99) per 10 nmol/l higher vitamin D status at baseline (adjusted for gender, season, alcohol consumption, smoking, physical activity, dietary habits, education, body mass index, and ALT). The risk of having a high level of ALT, AST, or GGT tended to be higher for lower vitamin D levels, although not statistically significant. In this general population study, vitamin D status was inversely associated with incident liver disease. Further studies are needed to determine whether patients in risk of developing impaired liver function should be screened for vitamin D deficiency for preventive purposes.

AB - Vitamin D deficiency is common among patients with liver diseases. Both cholestatic and non-cholestatic liver diseases can cause vitamin D deficiency. Whether vitamin D status can also affect liver function is poorly understood. To investigate the association between vitamin D status, liver enzymes, and incident liver disease, we included a total of 2,649 individuals from the Monica10 study conducted in 1993-1994. Vitamin D status as assessed by serum 25-hydroxyvitamin, serum alanine transaminase (ALT), aspartate transaminase (AST), and gamma glutamyl transferase (GGT) were measured at baseline. Information on fatal and non-fatal liver disease was obtained from the Danish National Patient Register and The Danish Registry of Causes of Death, respectively. Median follow-up time was 16.5 years, and there were 62 incident cases of fatal and non-fatal liver disease. Multivariable Cox regression analyses with age as underlying time axis and delayed entry showed a statistically significant inverse association between vitamin D status and incident liver disease with a hazard ratio = 0.88 (95 % confidence interval 0.79-0.99) per 10 nmol/l higher vitamin D status at baseline (adjusted for gender, season, alcohol consumption, smoking, physical activity, dietary habits, education, body mass index, and ALT). The risk of having a high level of ALT, AST, or GGT tended to be higher for lower vitamin D levels, although not statistically significant. In this general population study, vitamin D status was inversely associated with incident liver disease. Further studies are needed to determine whether patients in risk of developing impaired liver function should be screened for vitamin D deficiency for preventive purposes.

KW - Adult

KW - Aged

KW - Denmark

KW - Female

KW - Humans

KW - Incidence

KW - Liver

KW - Liver Diseases

KW - Liver Function Tests

KW - Male

KW - Middle Aged

KW - Mortality

KW - Vitamin D

KW - Vitamin D Deficiency

U2 - 10.1007/s12020-013-0107-8

DO - 10.1007/s12020-013-0107-8

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 24272594

VL - 47

SP - 213

EP - 220

JO - Endocrine

JF - Endocrine

SN - 1355-008X

IS - 1

ER -

ID: 138776930