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Wildlife reserves, populations and hunting outcome with smart wildlife

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftKonferenceabstrakt i tidsskriftForskning

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Wildlife reserves, populations and hunting outcome with smart wildlife. / Jensen, Frank; Jacobsen, Jette Bredahl; Thorsen, Bo Jellesmark.

I: Scandinavian Forest Economics, Bind 45, 2014, s. 58.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftKonferenceabstrakt i tidsskriftForskning

Harvard

Jensen, F, Jacobsen, JB & Thorsen, BJ 2014, 'Wildlife reserves, populations and hunting outcome with smart wildlife', Scandinavian Forest Economics, bind 45, s. 58.

APA

Jensen, F., Jacobsen, J. B., & Thorsen, B. J. (2014). Wildlife reserves, populations and hunting outcome with smart wildlife. Scandinavian Forest Economics, 45, 58.

Vancouver

Jensen F, Jacobsen JB, Thorsen BJ. Wildlife reserves, populations and hunting outcome with smart wildlife. Scandinavian Forest Economics. 2014;45:58.

Author

Jensen, Frank ; Jacobsen, Jette Bredahl ; Thorsen, Bo Jellesmark. / Wildlife reserves, populations and hunting outcome with smart wildlife. I: Scandinavian Forest Economics. 2014 ; Bind 45. s. 58.

Bibtex

@article{83344296258b4a899f6b427b91fe9a52,
title = "Wildlife reserves, populations and hunting outcome with smart wildlife",
abstract = "There is a very small natural resource economic literature on natural reserves and hunting that consider potential stress effects of hunting on the game population and its migration in and out of hunting and reserve areas. In this literature private optimal solution with and without stress effects is compared. There is no consideration on the social optimum. In this paper we consider both private and social optimum in the case where two-way migration between the hunting andreserve areas occur. Thus, migration depends on both hunting pressure and relative population densities. In the social optimum we reach ambiguous results when comparing a situation with and without stress effects. A pure stress effect implies that the population level in a wildlife reserve increase and the population level in the hunting area decrease in optimum. However, this change in optimal population levels increase migration from the wildlife reserve to the hunting area in the social optimum. The total effect is, therefore, ambiguous. For the privateoptimum open-access is assumed and exactly the same results arise as in the social optimum when comparing a situation with and without stress effects.",
author = "Frank Jensen and Jacobsen, {Jette Bredahl} and Thorsen, {Bo Jellesmark}",
year = "2014",
language = "English",
volume = "45",
pages = "58",
journal = "Scandinavian Forest Economics",
issn = "0355-032X",
note = "null ; Conference date: 21-05-2014 Through 24-05-2014",

}

RIS

TY - ABST

T1 - Wildlife reserves, populations and hunting outcome with smart wildlife

AU - Jensen, Frank

AU - Jacobsen, Jette Bredahl

AU - Thorsen, Bo Jellesmark

PY - 2014

Y1 - 2014

N2 - There is a very small natural resource economic literature on natural reserves and hunting that consider potential stress effects of hunting on the game population and its migration in and out of hunting and reserve areas. In this literature private optimal solution with and without stress effects is compared. There is no consideration on the social optimum. In this paper we consider both private and social optimum in the case where two-way migration between the hunting andreserve areas occur. Thus, migration depends on both hunting pressure and relative population densities. In the social optimum we reach ambiguous results when comparing a situation with and without stress effects. A pure stress effect implies that the population level in a wildlife reserve increase and the population level in the hunting area decrease in optimum. However, this change in optimal population levels increase migration from the wildlife reserve to the hunting area in the social optimum. The total effect is, therefore, ambiguous. For the privateoptimum open-access is assumed and exactly the same results arise as in the social optimum when comparing a situation with and without stress effects.

AB - There is a very small natural resource economic literature on natural reserves and hunting that consider potential stress effects of hunting on the game population and its migration in and out of hunting and reserve areas. In this literature private optimal solution with and without stress effects is compared. There is no consideration on the social optimum. In this paper we consider both private and social optimum in the case where two-way migration between the hunting andreserve areas occur. Thus, migration depends on both hunting pressure and relative population densities. In the social optimum we reach ambiguous results when comparing a situation with and without stress effects. A pure stress effect implies that the population level in a wildlife reserve increase and the population level in the hunting area decrease in optimum. However, this change in optimal population levels increase migration from the wildlife reserve to the hunting area in the social optimum. The total effect is, therefore, ambiguous. For the privateoptimum open-access is assumed and exactly the same results arise as in the social optimum when comparing a situation with and without stress effects.

M3 - Conference abstract in journal

VL - 45

SP - 58

JO - Scandinavian Forest Economics

JF - Scandinavian Forest Economics

SN - 0355-032X

Y2 - 21 May 2014 through 24 May 2014

ER -

ID: 132140416